Problem running 220volt motor on local electricity supply

In summary: The motors will have to be replaced.In summary, the company imported machinery from a country with a different electrical standard. All the motors and electric panels were designed for 220/110 volts, but the equipment is now tripping due to the higher voltage. A transformer may be necessary to convert the voltage, and the company is also considering changing the equipment to operate on 50Hz or 60Hz.
  • #1
hajialeem
3
0
The local electric supply in our country is 415 volts. Our company recently imported plant and machinery. All the motors and electric panels that have been imported are on 220/110 volts specifications. The total load of the motors is 110 Kw.

The motors are now tripping as soon as they are started. Can someone please provide a solution!
 
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  • #2
hajialeem said:
The local electric supply in our country is 415 volts. Our company recently imported plant and machinery. All the motors and electric panels that have been imported are on 220/110 volts specifications. The total load of the motors is 110 Kw.

The motors are now tripping as soon as they are started. Can someone please provide a solution!

Welcome to the PF.

Why was the incorrect equipment purchased? Can it be exchanged for the proper equipment?
 
  • #3
berkeman said:
Welcome to the PF.

Why was the incorrect equipment purchased? Can it be exchanged for the proper equipment?

An oversight from the supplier. It can be changed but shipping times are long, approx. 25 days and the company is not ready to delay the project that long
 
  • #4
Can you clarify exactly what you've got there hajialeem: Are you saying that the rated phase voltages on your machines are 220V and you want to run them on 240. I'm assuming you currently have the 220 volt windings star connected making them a nominal rating of 220*sqrt(3) = 380 volts, whereas you're actually running them from 415 volts is that correct.

BTW. Are you using 50Hz or 60Hz?
 
  • #5
How did you hook up the 220VAC motor to 415VAC system? Do you have a transformer to step down 415VAC to 220VAC? What brand of inverter are you using and what is the trip alarm?
 
  • #6
Hi hajialeem! :smile:

220/110 V electrical equipment is kind of an international standard.

Can you get your hands on an adapter that transforms whatever voltage you have (that's not entirely clear from your statement) to the standard 220 or 110 V?
 
  • #7
Yeah, I'd be surprised if the facility didn't have 220 or 240V. What country is it?
 
  • #8
uart said:
Can you clarify exactly what you've got there hajialeem: Are you saying that the rated phase voltages on your machines are 220V and you want to run them on 240. I'm assuming you currently have the 220 volt windings star connected making them a nominal rating of 220*sqrt(3) = 380 volts, whereas you're actually running them from 415 volts is that correct.

BTW. Are you using 50Hz or 60Hz?


The rated voltages on the motors are 220volt (three phase). We want to run them on the local supply (415volts - three phase). The motors are 50Hz.
Is there a way to run the motors without the need of a step down transformer?
 
  • #9
hajialeem said:
The rated voltages on the motors are 220volt (three phase). We want to run them on the local supply (415volts - three phase). The motors are 50Hz.
Is there a way to run the motors without the need of a step down transformer?

No, sorry. There is no hacking way to fix this error.
 

Related to Problem running 220volt motor on local electricity supply

1. Can I run a 220volt motor on my local electricity supply?

Yes, it is possible to run a 220volt motor on your local electricity supply. However, it is important to ensure that your local electricity supply can handle the voltage and current requirements of the motor. It is recommended to consult with a licensed electrician before attempting to connect the motor to your local electricity supply.

2. What are the risks of running a 220volt motor on my local electricity supply?

The main risk of running a 220volt motor on your local electricity supply is potential damage to the motor or your electrical system. If your local electricity supply is not equipped to handle the voltage and current requirements of the motor, it can lead to overheating, short-circuiting, or other electrical hazards.

3. Do I need a voltage converter to run a 220volt motor on my local electricity supply?

In most cases, a voltage converter is not necessary to run a 220volt motor on your local electricity supply. Many modern electrical systems are designed to handle a range of voltages, including 220volts. However, it is important to check with a licensed electrician to ensure that your local electricity supply is compatible with the motor.

4. Can I use a step-up transformer to run a 220volt motor on my local electricity supply?

Using a step-up transformer to run a 220volt motor on your local electricity supply is possible, but it may not be the most efficient or cost-effective solution. The transformer may introduce additional complications and risks to your electrical system. It is best to consult with a licensed electrician to determine the most suitable method for running the motor on your local electricity supply.

5. What precautions should I take when running a 220volt motor on my local electricity supply?

When running a 220volt motor on your local electricity supply, it is important to take precautions to ensure the safety of yourself and your electrical system. This includes checking for any potential compatibility issues, using proper wiring and grounding techniques, and regularly monitoring the motor for any signs of damage or malfunction. It is also recommended to have a licensed electrician inspect and approve the setup before use.

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