Quantum information/symmetry/group theory.

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  • #2
haushofer
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You just expand the U up to linear order. What exactly is not clear to you?
 
  • #4
Fredrik
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2.18 is unrelated to 2.17. It's just a Taylor expansion of U(R(t)) around t=0, where t is some set of parameters (e.g. three Euler angles when R(t) is a rotation).

Edit: Weird...I didn't even see Haushofer's reply before I posted.
 
  • #5
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Apologies, it sounded unclear from what I wrote, I want to know about the bit after 2.17 that leads to 2.18. I know the two equations are unrelated.

ie. R = I + eT, what does that mean that U = 1 - ieQ + O(e^2) ??
 
  • #6
Fredrik
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It's just a Taylor expansion around 0.

[tex]f(x)=f(0)+xf'(0)+\frac 1 2 x^2 f''(0)+\cdots[/tex]

[tex]U(R(\varepsilon))=U(R(0))+\varepsilon\frac{d}{d\varepsilon}\bigg|_0 U(R(\varepsilon))+\mathcal O(\varepsilon^2)[/tex]

It assumes that the paremeter [itex]\varepsilon[/itex] has been chosen so that [itex]R(0)[/itex] is the identity elememt of the group. The function [itex]U:G\rightarrow GL(V)[/itex] is a representation of the group G, so it must take the identity element of the group to the identity element in GL(V). The Q that appears on the right is defined by writing the first order term of the expansion as [itex]-i\varepsilon Q[/itex].
 
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