Question regarding energy, BTU

In summary, assuming a 1% increase in the population of the U.S., the national annual energy budget will need to add 9.7776 x 10^14 BTU to maintain the same per capita expenditure of 58 barrels of oil. However, the answer may vary depending on whether the questioner meant 58 barrels of oil or 58 barrel of oil equivalents. More information and calculations are needed for a precise answer.
  • #1
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"Assume that the population of the U.S. increases by 1%/yr. How many BTU of energy will have to be added to the national annual energy budget this year to maintain the same per capita expenditure?"

The current populations is listed as 291 million. And the current per capita energy expenditure = 58 barrels of oil.

I wasn't sure what to do. I guessed and ended up with 9.7776 X 10 to the 14, BTU increase. Can anyone help me out a bit?
 
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  • #2
I think you assumed the questioner meant 58 barrel of oil equivalents and, in that case, you seem to have done it correctly, except you've used too many significant figures in your answer. Can you show your calculations?
 
  • #3


I can provide a more accurate calculation for the BTU increase needed to maintain the same per capita energy expenditure. Based on the current population of 291 million and assuming a 1% annual increase, the population of the US would be approximately 293.91 million this year.

To calculate the total energy budget, we need to multiply the per capita energy expenditure (58 barrels of oil) by the population. This gives us a total energy budget of 17.04 billion barrels of oil for this year.

To maintain the same per capita energy expenditure, we need to divide the total energy budget by the population. This gives us an average of 58.08 barrels of oil per person.

To convert barrels of oil to BTU, we can use the conversion factor of 1 barrel of oil = 5.8 million BTU. Therefore, the total BTU increase needed this year would be 58.08 barrels of oil per person multiplied by 293.91 million people, which equals approximately 1.7 x 10^16 BTU.

This is a significantly larger number than the one you calculated, and it highlights the importance of using accurate and precise calculations in scientific research. It is also important to consider other factors that may affect energy consumption, such as technological advancements and changes in energy sources.
 

Related to Question regarding energy, BTU

What is energy?

Energy is the ability to do work or cause change. It comes in many forms, such as light, heat, electricity, and chemical energy.

What is a BTU?

BTU stands for British Thermal Unit and is a unit of measurement for energy. It is commonly used to measure the amount of heat needed to raise the temperature of one pound of water by one degree Fahrenheit.

How is energy measured in BTUs?

Energy can be measured in BTUs by calculating the amount of heat needed to raise the temperature of a specific substance by a certain amount. For example, the energy needed to heat up a specific volume of water by one degree Fahrenheit is equal to one BTU.

What are some common uses for BTUs?

BTUs are commonly used in the energy industry to measure the amount of heat produced by fuels like natural gas, oil, and coal. They are also used in the HVAC industry to measure the capacity of heating and cooling systems.

How does understanding BTUs help with energy efficiency?

Understanding BTUs can help with energy efficiency by allowing us to accurately measure and compare the energy consumption of different systems or fuels. This information can then be used to make more informed decisions about energy usage and potentially save energy and reduce costs.

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