Quick question about bacterial spore or endospore?

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In summary: This is where the daughter cells divide in two, and this process is facilitated by the presence of a spore-forming organelle.
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Hello everyone,

Why is bacterial endospore not called a true spore. So true spore must be an off spring right. In endospore formation bacteria replicates itself and mother DNA dies, so what is inside the endospore is an off spring, not the dormant form of orginal bacteria. So why is endospore not a true spore? Thank you :smile:
 
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  • #2
sameeralord said:
In endospore formation bacteria replicates itself and mother DNA dies, so what is inside the endospore is an off spring, not the dormant form of orginal bacteria.

Where did you read this?
 
  • #3
Endospores are non-reproductive spores. They are a survival mechanism. They are when the "going gets tough" and the vegetative cell is under harsh conditions. The vegetative cell's DNA is protected by dipicolinic acid (hypothesized). What is inside the bacterial endospore is dormant DNA from the vegetative cell.

"Spores" are for reproductive means, like with fungus.

Spore trivia for your studies;

Clostridium perfringens food poisoning produces its exotoxin during sporulation.

Chlamydia, Chlamydophila and Coxiella use "spore-like" forms that are very hardy and persistent in the environment (called elementary bodies in Chlamydia).
 
  • #4
mishrashubham said:
Where did you read this?

Wiki: The DNA is replicated and a membrane wall known as a spore septum begins to form between it and the rest of the cell. The plasma membrane of the cell surrounds this wall and pinches off to leave a double membrane around the DNA, and the developing structure is now known as a forespore. Calcium dipicolinate is incorporated into the forespore during this time. Next the peptidoglycan cortex forms between the two layers and the bacterium adds a spore coat to the outside of the forespore. Sporulation is now complete, and the mature endospore will be released when the surrounding vegetative cell is degraded. Also this video

I understand it is not reproductive state, but the endospore contains a replicated version of the vegetative bacteria right, not the orginal one.


Thanks both for replies :smile:
 
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  • #5
Certain bacteria such as Streptomyces form "reproductive spores" which can survive adverse conditions and are designed for widespread dispersal by wind, water etc. They do not undergo binary fission; this is their primary mode of reproduction. Spores are formed as round structures around the filamentous body of Streptomyces.
Endospores are also dormant structures designed to withstand tough conditions, but unlike their reproductive counterparts, they are not formed in multitude and are not made for dispersion in the surroundings. Only a single endospore is formed by a bacterial cell, which then gives rise to only a single vegetative bacterial cell in favourable conditions. Reproduction in bacteria is mainly concerned with rapid multiplication and colony formation. Bacteria such as Bacillus form endospores but their primary mode of reproduction is binary fission.
 

1. What is a bacterial spore or endospore?

A bacterial spore or endospore is a dormant, highly resistant form of bacteria that can survive extreme environmental conditions such as heat, radiation, and chemicals. It is formed by some species of bacteria as a survival mechanism when conditions become unfavorable for growth.

2. How are bacterial spores different from regular bacteria?

Bacterial spores are different from regular bacteria in several ways. They are smaller in size, have thicker and more durable cell walls, and contain very low levels of water. They also have a unique DNA repair mechanism that allows them to withstand harsh conditions.

3. How long can bacterial spores survive?

Bacterial spores can survive for extended periods of time, ranging from several years to centuries, depending on the species and environmental conditions. Some species, such as Bacillus anthracis (the causative agent of anthrax), have been shown to survive for thousands of years.

4. What is the purpose of bacterial spores?

The purpose of bacterial spores is to ensure the survival of the bacteria in unfavorable conditions. When conditions become more favorable, the spore will germinate and develop into a regular bacterial cell, allowing the bacteria to resume growth and reproduction.

5. Can bacterial spores cause disease?

Yes, some bacterial spores have the ability to cause disease. For example, Bacillus anthracis, Clostridium tetani (the causative agent of tetanus), and Clostridium botulinum (the causative agent of botulism) can form spores that can cause severe illnesses in humans and animals. However, not all bacterial spores are pathogenic, and many are harmless to humans.

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