Radioactive Detector - Get Sensor & Price Info

In summary: The Geiger-Mueller tube is an analog device while the PIN diode is digital. Depending on your application, you may be better off using one of these two options.
  • #1
ws0619
53
0
Hi!
I am looking for a sensor that can sense radioactive particle. It will alert when the amount of the radioactive particle in air is high. I found many radioactive detector, but I need is the sensor in the detector.

Can someone suggests for me this kind of sensor (as small as possible)?

Hope:brand name and price!

Thanks!
 
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  • #3
Here is a list of Geiger tubes from LND inc (Oceanside, NY). I have used their smallest one a while ago. The smallest ones are less than 5.3 mm diameter. The larger ones are more efficient.
http://www.lndinc.com/products/category/8/
Bob S
 
  • #4
beside Geiger tube does any sensor can use to sense radioactive particle?I look for sensor as small as possible that I can fix it on my PCB.
 
  • #5
Bob S said:
Here is a list of Geiger tubes from LND inc (Oceanside, NY). I have used their smallest one a while ago. The smallest ones are less than 5.3 mm diameter. The larger ones are more efficient.
http://www.lndinc.com/products/category/8/
Bob S

Thanks! I will try this.
 
  • #6
ws0619 said:
Thanks! I will try this.
The Geiger tube requires about 500 volts to operate. Some large-area solid state PIN diodes can be used as cosmic ray / radioactivity detectors.. This Hamamatsu PIN diode can be used without a scintillator.
http://sales.hamamatsu.com/assets/pdf/parts_S/S2744-08_etc.pdf
Bob S
 
  • #7
Depending on your application, perhaps you could use the radiation ionization chamber from a smoke detector. PCB mountable and all of about $7
 
  • #8
The ionization-type smoke detector works on the basis of a very small ionization current created by a radioactive source inside the detector. Smoke ions in the air reduce the current in the chamber. So the two issues are 1) How sensitive is the ion chamber to radioactivity in the air if the radioactive source is removed, and 2) How difficult is it to convert the ionization current into a digital format? A good idea of the volume and current in ionization chambers can be obtained by looking at the design of pocket ionization chambers:
http://www.orau.org/ptp/collection/dosimeters/pocketchamdos.htm
On the other hand, the Geiger-Mueller tubes and PIN diodes have pulse outputs, and require minimal external electronics to interface to other circuits.
Bob S
 

Related to Radioactive Detector - Get Sensor & Price Info

1. What is a radioactive detector?

A radioactive detector is a device used to measure and detect the presence and intensity of ionizing radiation. It is used in various fields, including medicine, research, and environmental monitoring.

2. How does a radioactive detector work?

A radioactive detector works by using sensors, such as a Geiger-Muller tube or scintillation detector, to detect the radiation emitted by radioactive sources. The sensors produce electrical signals that are then processed and displayed on the detector's screen as counts per unit time.

3. What types of radiation can a radioactive detector detect?

A radioactive detector can detect different types of ionizing radiation, including alpha, beta, and gamma radiation. Some detectors can also detect neutron radiation and X-rays.

4. How accurate is a radioactive detector?

The accuracy of a radioactive detector depends on various factors, such as the type of sensor used, calibration, and environmental conditions. Generally, most detectors have a high level of accuracy and can detect even small levels of radiation.

5. What is the price range for a radioactive detector?

The price range for a radioactive detector can vary greatly depending on the type, features, and brand. Basic handheld detectors can range from $50 to $500, while more advanced and specialized detectors can cost thousands of dollars.

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