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Really want to study formal math with proofs

  1. Nov 19, 2006 #1
    I was wondering i really want to study formal math with proofs etc. Are there any good books out there?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 19, 2006 #2

    chroot

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    What level?

    - Warren
     
  4. Nov 19, 2006 #3
    Well, knowing what sub-discipline of math you're interested in would help ( I wouldn't be able to answer anyway, but I am sure that info will be needed :P)

    Try the science book reviews at the top of this forum (Academic Advice.) There should be some good stuff there, I will look for a good thread for you as I think I remember one.
     
  5. Nov 19, 2006 #4
  6. Nov 19, 2006 #5
    I can personally recommend Calculus Concepts and Contexts by James Stewart for introductory calc. Although I think Apostle is better for proof based Calculus.
     
  7. Nov 19, 2006 #6
    Yah I really like Math.. I am not just sure where to start. I really want to get down to the roots. Keep in mind I will be starting Calc next Semester.
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2006
  8. Nov 19, 2006 #7
    Well I think I would be able to help you there. How comfortable are you with algebra? Do you know all your exponent laws real good? Binomial theorem, trigonometry, stuff like that.
     
  9. Nov 19, 2006 #8

    chroot

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    Any good calc book (Apostol is the best, IMO) will have many, many proofs you can mull over.

    - Warren
     
  10. Nov 19, 2006 #9
    Oh man yah I defiantely got Algebra down, but still enjoy it. Trig, Binomial, yup know them too. Easy stuff.
     
  11. Nov 19, 2006 #10
    Try Apostol then, maybe Chroot knows the title of the textbook but I have a feeling its something like One-Variable Calculus with an introduction to Linear Algebra.

    I liked James Stewart since it was more applied then Apostol, was geared moreso to scientists/engineers than mathematicians. But if you like the proofs/rigorous type stuff, I think Apostol is the way to go.
     
  12. Nov 19, 2006 #11

    JasonRox

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    Does Apostol have proofs, or does he just ask you to write them?

    For example, Spivak asks you to write many many proofs, yet lacks the ability to have some of this one. The ratio of examples to exersices is like 1:50.
     
  13. Nov 19, 2006 #12

    chroot

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    I can pull out my copy and check the 'ratio,' but I believe it has more proofs than do many other texts.

    - Warren
     
  14. Nov 19, 2006 #13
    Yah I really want to build up a good library of knowledge of math not just for school, but just for pure satisfaction. I would like to in the long run look at tensors, etc.-I will probably end up studing math most my life for leisure.
     
  15. Nov 19, 2006 #14

    chroot

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    The Schaum's outlines might be right up your alley, too, if you intend to do a lot of self-teaching. They're cheap and have hundreds of worked examples. They don't have many proofs, but they might complement a thorough textbook nicely for you.

    - Warren
     
  16. Nov 19, 2006 #15
    Cool, what about advanced Geometies like: Non-Euclid Geometries/hyper geometries and proofs of those?
     
  17. Nov 19, 2006 #16
    For Calculus use Louis Leithold's TC 7
     
  18. Nov 19, 2006 #17
    Any advice on mastering Calc 1-3?
    Just work tons of examples?
     
  19. Nov 19, 2006 #18
    Do tons of problems and try to understand everything. I found that if I skipped over something that didn't make sense than later down the road I would find myself not knowing to how to solve stuff. As you probably know, you can't read a math text like a social text, can't skip stuff, it all builds on each preceding topic.

    Do every single problem in the book if you want to master it, its the only way.
     
  20. Nov 19, 2006 #19
    I would also look at a book on proofs. (I used Solow's How to Read and do proofs.) I was only familiar with two column proofs that I did in geometry, so I needed a little help writing proofs. You might not need that though. :)
     
  21. Nov 19, 2006 #20
    Which one is better: Rea Problem Solver for Calculus? Or Schuman Outline to Calculus?
     
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