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Refraction - Hitting fish with laser gun

  1. Dec 3, 2004 #1
    if you were to hit a fish with a laser gun, how would you aim? (provided that laser if faster than light). Pls explain.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 3, 2004 #2

    Tide

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    I would aim directly at where I see the fish! And, no, the laser light is not faster than light because - well - it IS light!
     
  4. Dec 4, 2004 #3
    I will not shoot at its apparent position.
     
  5. Dec 4, 2004 #4

    Tide

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    Why not? Don't you expect the light going into the water to follow the same path as light coming out of the water?
     
  6. Dec 4, 2004 #5
    depends on where the fish is :P
     
  7. Dec 4, 2004 #6

    Tide

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    Logically, the fish is in the water. If the fish were not in the water then there would be no need to aim at it. You would simply pick up the fish, carry it to the skillet and fry it with the laser. :-)
     
  8. Dec 4, 2004 #7
    According to relativity principles light deviates when it is affected by gravity. This is not true for laser. Therefore the fish will actually be higher than it seems.
    Now that I realize it is a fish I suppose it is in water :p
    Let's say that the laser is faster than light.
    I believe it is possible that the faster something is the less it bends when switching from an envirement to another (per say air-water) not fully sure of this as I have no proof
    If this was true though then light passing penetrating the water would bend with an angle theta while the laser would bend with an angle < theta. In order to hit the fish you would have to aim beneath the fish so that theta(laser)>theta(light).

    This is too much guessing to be of any real use but might provide some ideas which you can mix with coursework to get the real answer. Just look up on how speed of a travelling object (be it light or laser) propagates while passing between different mediums, have fun!
     
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