Regarding learning from Griffiths

In summary, the conversation reveals that the speaker is an undergraduate student who has studied from the Resnik book and is planning to study the Feynman lectures vol1. They are looking for a solid grasp on theory and are considering jumping to another book to focus on electrostatics. However, they are facing problems with the math required and are considering studying vector calculus concurrently with physics to improve their understanding. The conversation also includes advice to solve as many problems as possible to master the fundamentals.
  • #1
rudransh verma
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I am a undergraduate student and have done some studying from Resnik book (principles of physics). I have also got Feynman lectures vol1 which I am planning to study with Resnik. I think it will give me a solid grasp on theory. I am getting bored now after doing some chapters from Resnik(coulombs law, electric field, gauss law, motion in 1D and 2D and 3D).

I am thinking to jump to some other book to go in detail in say electrostatics to refresh my boring routine. So I have picked up introduction to electrodynamics in which 2nd chapter is electrostatics. But I face problem with math. I don't know anything about vector analysis except vector algebra. How should I now prepare myself mathematically to understand the electrostatics part of griffiths.

How about getting a mathematical methods for physics and engineering by riley, Hobson, Bence where I can learn stuff like divergence, curl, del operator, gradient, line, surface, volume integral used in this chapter.
Vector analysis chapter is given in this griffiths book but not in much detail. I also have vector analysis by schaum's.
 
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  • #2
rudransh verma said:
How should I now prepare myself mathematically to understand the electrostatics part of griffiths.
1. Finish Resnick and Halliday.
2. Worth through a book on vector calc, e.g. Thomas
 
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  • #3
Vanadium 50 said:
Worth through a book on vector calc, e.g. Thomas
I have vector analysis by schaums. Is it worth it?
 
  • #4
1. Finish Resnick and Halliday.
 
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  • #5
Vanadium 50 said:
1. Finish Resnick and Halliday.
@rudransh verma: This is good advice that bears repeating. (Again.)

Also: Solve as many problems as you can.
 
  • #6
Doc Al said:
@rudransh verma: This is good advice that bears repeating. (Again.)

Also: Solve as many problems as you can.
Getting boring 🤢
 
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  • #7
rudransh verma said:
Getting boring 🤢
Here's an excerpt from a reply I posted in another thread (https://www.physicsforums.com/threa...eshman-year-of-physics-at-university.1008318/). It is relevant to you as well:

"What I've gathered from reading your post is this: You are enamored of the grand concepts of physics, but you don't have the patience, discipline, and drive to work through the fundamentals. Physics is like many other fields: There's the fun stuff, and there's the not-so-fun stuff (what is fun and what is not-so-fun depends on the individual). But to succeed at the fun stuff, you also need to succeed at the not-so-fun stuff."

Jumping into intermediate level physics without a good grounding in introductory level physics (and the requisite math) is a really, really bad idea. If you continue down this path, you'll soon be posting, "I'm bored with Griffiths, so I'm thinking of taking the leap to Jackson. But I face problems with the math ..."
 
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  • #8
CrysPhys said:
Here's an excerpt from a reply I posted in another thread (https://www.physicsforums.com/threa...eshman-year-of-physics-at-university.1008318/). It is relevant to you as well:

"What I've gathered from reading your post is this: You are enamored of the grand concepts of physics, but you don't have the patience, discipline, and drive to work through the fundamentals. Physics is like many other fields: There's the fun stuff, and there's the not-so-fun stuff (what is fun and what is not-so-fun depends on the individual). But to succeed at the fun stuff, you also need to succeed at the not-so-fun stuff."

Jumping into intermediate level physics without a good grounding in introductory level physics (and the requisite math) is a really, really bad idea. If you continue down this path, you'll soon be posting, "I'm bored with Griffiths, so I'm thinking of taking the leap to Jackson. But I face problems with the math ..."
Seems reasonable. God help me
 
  • #9
My college physics 101 professor had a sign on his office wall, with what I assume was a refrain he'd heard way too many times: "I really understand the material. I just can't do the problems." (And years later I heard it myself from my own students.)

This is why I place so much emphasis on solving as many problems as you can stomach in as many ways as you can. Especially for the basics, that's the only way to really master the material.
 
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  • #10
Do you already have a year of calculus under your belt? If so, you might want to start learning vector calculus concurrently with the physics. Then you could try to make up more difficult versions of the problems in Halliday and Resnick and solve them in gory mathematical detail. For example, evaluate the flux due to a point charge where the Gaussian surface is a cube. (It'll give you a better appreciation of symmetry.)
 
  • #11
When I learned Griffiths's textbook, I found that the first chapter is sufficient. Maybe you need to solve more problems to get familiar with vectors? :wink:
 
  • #12
If your single variable calculus is solid (You have calc BC under your belt or equivalent):
- You can study this guide at the same time as learning griffiths.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/0393925161/?tag=pfamazon01-20

If not, I don't think it's a good idea to study griffiths without solid single variable calculus. Some of the parts are understandable but you wouldn't be able to solve most problems.
 

Related to Regarding learning from Griffiths

1. What is the main concept of learning from Griffiths?

The main concept of learning from Griffiths is to understand the principles and methods of scientific research and how to apply them in various fields of study.

2. Who is Griffiths and why is his work important?

Griffiths is a renowned scientist and author who has made significant contributions to the field of genetics and evolutionary biology. His work is important because it has helped shape our understanding of genetics and has practical applications in fields such as medicine and agriculture.

3. What are some key topics covered in Griffiths' work?

Some key topics covered in Griffiths' work include genetic variation, gene expression, genetic mapping, and population genetics. He also discusses the impact of genetics on evolution and human health.

4. How can learning from Griffiths benefit my scientific research?

Learning from Griffiths can benefit your scientific research by providing a strong foundation in key concepts and methods of genetics. This can help you design and conduct experiments, analyze data, and interpret results more effectively.

5. Is Griffiths' work suitable for beginners in the field of genetics?

Yes, Griffiths' work is suitable for beginners in the field of genetics. He presents complex concepts in a clear and concise manner, making it accessible for those with little to no prior knowledge of the subject. However, some basic understanding of biology and genetics is recommended.

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