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Researchers construct a model of impact for El Nino

  1. Oct 22, 2014 #1
    Earth is changing constantly and there is still so much we don't know about it.

    Researchers construct a model of impact for El Nino / La Nina events
    17 hours ago by Bob Yirka
    Phys.org) —A small team made up of researchers from the U.S. and Europe has constructed a model that helps map parts of the world that are most at risk of flooding due to El Niño/La Niña events. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team describes how they compared weather data over the past half century with economic impacts of actual floods to create a model that may soon be used to help predict flooding events in the future.
    By now, most everyone has heard about El Niño/La Niña weather events— El Niño is where warm water west of South America causes more rain to fall in some places. La Niña is where the same waters are cooler than normal resulting in different changes to rain patterns. Perhaps less well known is that such events have a worldwide impact, causing more flooding than normal in some parts of the world and less in others. Oftentimes the flooding that occurs results in damage to property and loss of life, thus it would be a good thing if forecasts could be made, warning people in areas most at risk. Unfortunately, up till now, such forecasts have not been available because such events don't always cause the same types of flooding in the same places. In this new effort, the researchers sought to provide a model for building such a forecasting ability by using data over a long period of time.

    The research team obtained weather data for the years 1959 to 2000, pulling out periods of El Niño/La Niña weather events which they then compared with reports of damage due to flooding. Next they compared those results with flood reports during normal times and used what they found to create a model. The model showed that during El Niño events, 34 percent of the Earth's surface had higher or lower than normal amounts of flooding—that number jumped to 38 percent for La Niña weather events.



    Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-10-impact-el-nino-la-nina.html#jCp
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/10/141021125943.htm
    http://geology.com/below-sea-level/
    http://www.scienceclarified.com/Di-El/Earth-Science.html
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 22, 2014 #2

    jedishrfu

    Staff: Mentor

    Cool...
     
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