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RF medical imaging

  1. Mar 23, 2014 #1
    hi,

    i have to prepare a presentation about rf imaging. But i didn't found any medical imaging system using rf. Is there anyone know commercial rf medical imaging system, please help me.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 23, 2014 #2

    berkeman

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    Welcome to the PF.

    What systems did you look at? What frequencies/modalities did they use? How do you define RF?
     
  4. Mar 23, 2014 #3
    thank you.
    like a computer tomography. There isn't spesific frequencies or modalities. İn fact i am not sure there is a rf medical imaging. İ found two patent paper, but there is no machine.
     
  5. Mar 23, 2014 #4
    I assume you mean a system that relies exclusively on RF, correct? After all, MRIs use RF radiation, but not without powerful magnetic fields.
     
  6. Mar 23, 2014 #5

    berkeman

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    Can you list the 10 most common medical imaging technologies, along with the range of frequencies that they use? You can start with Ultrasound, which does not use RF...
     
  7. Mar 23, 2014 #6
    i mean directly use rf, not MRI. i mention about extremely high frequencies (over 30 GHz).
     
  8. Mar 23, 2014 #7

    berkeman

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    Could you please post the exact problem statement or project statement? It's hard to be helpful when the definition of the problem keeps changing...
     
  9. Mar 23, 2014 #8
  10. Mar 23, 2014 #9
    sorry the other mean my friend will prepare ultrasound imaging..
     
  11. Mar 23, 2014 #10

    berkeman

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    The 2nd patent references yet another patent as well. You should try to see if any of these patents has been assigned to a company, because they may have developed some products based on the patents.

    The patents seem like a good place to start for your presentation. One thing to keep in mind if you don't find much imaging being done at RF frequencies -- why aren't those frequencies being used much? As stated in the patents, patient safety comes into play with the different imaging modalities (like with ionizing x-ray radiation)...
     
  12. Mar 23, 2014 #11
    How specific was your instructor about what constitutes RF? I've heard different people place different boundaries on the spectrum.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2014
  13. Mar 23, 2014 #12
    Thank you so much for your help berkeman, i will use your suggestion.
     
  14. Mar 23, 2014 #13
    I write software that analyzes Cancer treatment using what we call Linac = Linear Accelerator. This uses a klystron tube then increases the energy of the output up to "energy levels" 6Mev - 18Mev (Mev = mega electron volts). This is not used as imaging, but the X-Ray machines are very similar in the Kev range. You should understand the wavelength of a "energy" packet is tied to Planks constant. Read here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planck_constant , X-Ray & CT imaging use this as the source to "light" the field for detection via film or these days energy detectors (imaging detectors). You should find manufacturers such as Seimens, GE. That should get you started, it is very high frequency RF, but certainly not in "radio" range!!
     
  15. Mar 24, 2014 #14

    Baluncore

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    As I see it, MRI is the only “RF” imaging system. The need to generate a pulse, is going to be present with any RF imaging as there must be some source of stimulation to enable radar. It is the magnetic gradient fields that make MRI = RF imaging possible.

    I think you should go back to your instructor and get a clear ruling on MRI.
     
  16. Mar 24, 2014 #15

    f95toli

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    I guess one could include THz imaging in this (hundreds of GHz). I don't think it is used clinically, but I know active THz scanning/imaging has been tested for diagnosing e.g. various types of cancer (mainly skin and -I belive- in the mouth).
    But -as has been pointed out above- low RF frequencies simply can't be used for direct imaging because the wavelengths are far too long.
     
  17. Mar 24, 2014 #16

    sophiecentaur

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    You should go back to your instructor and ask him to define his task more precisely. To me, that assignment has the flavour of something 'off the top of his head'. It would be very reasonable for you to challenge him about what he means - substantiated by what you have read here and the fact that you couldn't easily find anything in a search.

    Imo, there is no way that X rays or higher energy photons could be classed as "RF". RF would have to be non-ionising, I reckon.
     
  18. Mar 24, 2014 #17
    İ suppose that i found my search area about my presentation. Thank you everyone.
    My focus is about terahertz imaging. Because it is on radio frequency band in some source such as wikipedia and others.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radio_spectrumhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radio_spectrum [Broken]
    İt is only one using in medical imaging area on rf band.
    http://www.teraview.com/
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
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