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RL circuit

  1. May 3, 2014 #1
    dddrhr.png

    Why is the initial current through the inductor 20A? Surely the current splits at the junctions?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 3, 2014 #2

    mfb

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    It is an ideal inductor, it has a resistance of 0. The splitting still gives 20 A to the inductor.
     
  4. May 3, 2014 #3
    So no current enters the 0.1 ohm resistor branch? Also, do we always assume its an ideal conductor in these types of questions?
     
  5. May 3, 2014 #4

    mfb

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    Right.
    To model a real inductor, we could simply add a series resistor in the sketch.
     
  6. May 3, 2014 #5
    If no current passes through the 0.1 ohm resistor then I am assuming no current passes through the other resistors either? So effectively, when the switch is closed, the circuit consists of just the current source and the inductor?
     
  7. May 4, 2014 #6

    mfb

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    Sure.
     
  8. May 4, 2014 #7
    If the inductor did have some resistance, lets say 0.01ohms, would that mean that the 20A is split between branches?
     
  9. May 4, 2014 #8

    mfb

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    Yes.
     
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