Robotic arm- Moment/bending moment/clamping force

  • Engineering
  • Thread starter Aaron Mac
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Arm Force
In summary: Thank you for your input! I'll be sure to consider those factors when designing my next project.In summary, LaTex says that the clamping force would have to cause enough friction between the clamp and the rod to prevent sliding.
  • #1
Aaron Mac
26
1
Homework Statement
Hello there, I'm currently designing a robotic arm, basically a revolute (shaft of rotating axis) and a prismatic joint (which further extends with the help of a motor), for which the necessary sizing has already been completed. As you can see, I previously created a counterweight to counteract the effect of the robotic arm's moment around the shaft while the gripper is holding something (payload) or even owing to the weight of the robotic arm itself. But, after some study, I discovered something called clamping force, which is utilized in the fastener industry, but I'm unable to make the required equations to establish the clamping force owing to my insufficient expertise in this area and maybe eliminating the counterweight. I'd appreciate it if someone could assist or guide me in this regard.
Relevant Equations
Mass of link 1 - 0.8kg
length of link 1 - 0.15m

Mass of link 2 - 1kg
length of link 2 - 0.15m

Mass of payload - 0.3kg
Acceleration due to gravity in this case = 10ms^-2

Counterweight calculation
Moment around the axis of rotation = F*D
=(8*0.15) + (13*0.15)
= 3.15 Nm
Screenshot (153).png
Screenshot (154).png
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
I think the clamping force would have to cause enough friction between the clamp and the rod to prevent sliding.

My LaTex isn't functioning right now, but I think it would be something like Fclamp * mu = mass * gravity.
 
  • #3
osilmag said:
My LaTex isn't functioning right now, but I think it would be something like Fclamp * mu = mass * gravity.
$$\mu F_{clamp} = mg$$
:wink:
 
  • Like
Likes Aaron Mac
  • #4
You are trying to resist the torque of rotating a payload with the arm at the shaft that drives the arm, correct?
 
  • #5
osilmag said:
I think the clamping force would have to cause enough friction between the clamp and the rod to prevent sliding.

My LaTex isn't functioning right now, but I think it would be something like Fclamp * mu = mass * gravity.
Thank you very much. I have already chosen my screws and need to calculate according to this screw clamping force.
 
  • #6
erobz said:
You are trying to resist the torque of rotating a payload with the arm at the shaft that drives the arm, correct?
No not really dear, it is the clamping force to resist deflection due to moment
 
  • #7
Aaron Mac said:
No not really dear, it is the clamping force to resist deflection due to moment
I don’t get it. If you have already specified the fastener based on the design load, you’ve already specified the clamp force. In other words, specifying the bolt specifies the clamp force.

Your question seems odd to me, because the clamp force is what should be determined based off of the design load, and the appropriate fastener selected off of the clamp force required. You seem to be doing the process backwards if you have already selected the fastener as you indicate in post #5?
 
Last edited:
  • #8
It's hard to tell from the picture, but I believe you are rotating the arm horizontally while it's carrying a load. The friction force at the shaft would have a very small moment arm. That torque is responsible for any angular acceleration the arm + payload experience around the axis of rotation (the shaft). The links and payload have moments of inertia about their own centers of mass, and they are compounded by the being at some distance from the center of rotation. Given the small moment arm of the applied force (from the clamping force of the collar) it's not clear to me which force is larger; simply supporting the weight of the arm and payload vertically, or the force involved in giving the system some modest angular acceleration?

$$ \frac{I_{tot} \alpha }{ r_{shaft}} \quad \text{or} \quad mg $$

In reality, fasteners are cheap, so you typically just select one that is obviously larger/stronger than necessary. Computing basic magnitudes might be more work than it's worth.
 
Last edited:
  • #9
Can you define your expectations using Laws of Motion for work to be done? e.g. Mass of target, acceleration, velocity , degrees of freedom , maximum radius. Desired minimum resonant frequency, joint stress-strain slack, moment of imbalance, mass of arm.
 
  • #10
Your design seems ok for space without gravity but weak on earth. I would think you want to have stronger bones and muscles.

1684181041562.png
 

1. What is a robotic arm?

A robotic arm is a mechanical device that is designed to mimic the movements of a human arm. It is composed of a series of links and joints, which are controlled by motors and sensors to perform various tasks.

2. What is moment in relation to a robotic arm?

Moment, also known as torque, is the rotational force applied to a robotic arm. It is calculated by multiplying the force applied to the arm by the distance from the point of rotation.

3. What is bending moment in relation to a robotic arm?

Bending moment is the measure of the amount of force required to bend a robotic arm. It is influenced by the length, shape, and material of the arm, as well as the amount of force applied to it.

4. How is clamping force important in a robotic arm?

Clamping force is the force applied by the robotic arm's gripper to hold onto an object. It is crucial in ensuring that the object is securely held and does not slip or fall during the arm's movements.

5. What factors affect the performance of a robotic arm's moment, bending moment, and clamping force?

The performance of a robotic arm's moment, bending moment, and clamping force can be affected by factors such as the weight and shape of the object being lifted, the speed and precision of the arm's movements, and the strength and durability of its components.

Similar threads

  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
919
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
927
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
871
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
11
Views
1K
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
4K
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
1K
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
916
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
8
Views
918
Back
Top