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Rough language for hard-working americans

  1. Sep 21, 2014 #1
    Heh, I caught myself swearing recently while working as a TA. And another time during a lecture I heard one professor almost blurt out the f-word (he is more of the chaos type).

    What's your job's policy on cursing?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 21, 2014 #2

    lisab

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    This is a great topic, Nikitin!

    I never used to use profanity. My parents didn't, and none of my friends did. Despite this I never believed there was such a thing as "bad" language. There is a time and place for everything and language is too precious for "No Trespassing" signs.

    I have a daughter who is very smart. When she became a teen, she used profanity (as so many teens do). I was, frankly, impressed with her skill. She had a knack for knowing when it made her look coarse and when it made her look like a poet. It changed my view of profanity. I'm now comfortable with it.

    Using profanity at work is tricky. It can indicate comfort and trust between peers. But I've seen high-ranking people use it to demonstrate high status, and low-ranking people use it to indicate low status. Middle-ranking people don't use it openly, in my experience.

    Of course your experience my be critically different from mine.
     
  4. Sep 21, 2014 #3

    Astronuc

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    Folks may use it out of exasperation or frustration, or in an outburst of anger, e.g., when one injures oneself. Most folks I know don't swear, except perhaps on rare occasion, but I have some friends who readily use profanity. I think I only heard my dad swear twice in his life, and both times were pretty emotional situations.

    Policy at work is 'No swearing', as I believe it is at most places. Certainly, one does not swear at a co-worker or subordinate. Such an act would involve discipline and possibly termination.
     
  5. Sep 21, 2014 #4
    That's a right-wing thought. :p
     
  6. Sep 21, 2014 #5

    lisab

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    Yeah, perhaps -- but I work in a very conservative, old-school industry.

    We have no policy that addresses profanity directly. Our policies are vague and smooshy, and can be interpreted as the situation requires...sigh.

    (I have heard our HR manager drop f-bombs, and once he called a subordinate a very unprofessional name. The subordinate left for a better offer but was hired back a few years later -- as the HR manager's boss! Ouch!)
     
  7. Sep 21, 2014 #6
    :DYeah it serves him right. I didn't see anyone at my workplaces swear. They have other ways to express how they feel better than swearing.
     
  8. Sep 22, 2014 #7
    I present to you Malcolm Fffing Tucker.
    NSFW
     
  9. Sep 22, 2014 #8

    collinsmark

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    Whale oil beef hooked.

    (try it with a cockney accent)
     
  10. Sep 22, 2014 #9
    How come when you do something really stupid like hitting your thumb with a hammer, you say "That SMARTS!" ? :)
     
  11. Sep 22, 2014 #10

    StatGuy2000

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    I think the appropriateness of cursing/profanity in the workplace depends very highly on context. At least in my own personal opinion, there is nothing wrong with co-workers occasionally swearing among themselves as a natural rhythm of their conversation in an informal discussion. However, profanity used out of anger or spite, or directed at others in a mean-spirited, abusive or aggressive manner is completely inappropriate. In a similar manner, profanity is also inappropriate and should be avoided at all costs in meetings or any discussion with clients, which should go without saying.

    I have also found that, at least based on my admittedly anecdotal and unscientific observation, people in Toronto and nearby surrounding areas (where I'm located), particularly those <50 years of age, tend to be much more relaxed about the use of profanity than many of the Americans I've encountered (although I acknowledge that this may not necessarily be typical of Canadians who live outside of Toronto).
     
  12. Sep 22, 2014 #11

    russ_watters

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    When I was in the Navy, I was out at a bar with a shipmate and he commented that he felt uncomfortable cursing around me, since I "never" did. Then I went home on leave and a friend told me she couldn't believe how much I cursed!

    Cultures differ.

    In my current company it is pretty rare in every-day working, but in context doesn't raise any eyebrows.

    I can probably count in the fingers of one hand how many times I've cursed around my parents, though (I'm 38).
     
  13. Sep 23, 2014 #12

    davenn

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    hahaha ... observe karma in action! :)


    Dave
     
  14. Sep 23, 2014 #13

    davenn

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    man alive !!!

    I have just listened through a barrage ( not directed at me, phew) of f this, f that, f him, get f'in over it ..... probably used 20 times in less than 5 minutes and as I type its still going !

    D
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2014
  15. Sep 23, 2014 #14

    lisab

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    Dear me - where is it coming from?
     
  16. Sep 23, 2014 #15

    davenn

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    The operations manager
    Im not sure if it was directed at customer or worker ( neither present)
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2014
  17. Sep 25, 2014 #16
    Personally, I don't like this taboo business. Swear-words have a place in language as much as any others, and trying to control them thru "norms of moral behavior" and such is just silly.
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2014
  18. Sep 25, 2014 #17

    wolram

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    I never swear, my mother and father taught me not to [ with a quick flip behind the earhole], but to my shame the English seem to use the F word more and more, i cringe when i hear it used as common language in public.
     
  19. Sep 25, 2014 #18
    There wasn't single day when I was at work and nobody cussed :D It's just good humor, helps pass the time and everybody has a smile on their face.
     
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