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Scientists want to drill into the Earth's mantle

  1. Jan 5, 2018 #1
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 6, 2018 #2

    lekh2003

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  4. Jan 6, 2018 #3

    davenn

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    yeah, because they were drilling through very thick continental crust rather than the much thinner oceanic crust planned for this new mission
     
  5. Jan 7, 2018 #4
    What will they do after they break through to the mantle?

    What is the purpose of this?
     
  6. Jan 7, 2018 #5

    lekh2003

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    Yeah, I understand. It was their mission to reach really deep, not the mantle.
     
  7. Jan 7, 2018 #6

    lekh2003

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    Find the composition of the mantle with more accuracy.
     
  8. Jan 7, 2018 #7

    mfb

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    A lot can happen in 12 years.

    Temperature is a big issue with boreholes this deep, especially if you want to reach the mantle. I wonder how they plan to deal with this.
     
  9. Jan 8, 2018 #8
  10. Jan 8, 2018 #9
    It reminded me a movie "The Core". They were using diamond hood to drill to the core.
     
  11. Jan 10, 2018 #10

    Vanadium 50

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    Or my favorite Doctor Who, Inferno. (Third Doctor, the last episode with Caroline John)
     
  12. Jan 16, 2018 #11

    TeethWhitener

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  13. Jan 17, 2018 #12
    The purpose of this is to finally examine the largest part of the Earth in situ. We already have a numer of samples from the mantle: in ophiolites, where they form the deepest part of the floor of long-vanished oceans; in kimberlites which we mine to put a particular mantle mineral in engagement rings; finally in xenoliths, chunks of rocks torn from the depths by flowing magma. [Funny thing is that we actually know more of the uppermost mantle than the lowermost crust] The problem with our samples is that up here they are not what they were down there: they are devoid of natural gases and composed of hard-to-melt residue from original rocks. We don't know the precise mineral composition of parent rock or the original orientation of crystals. Better knowledge of these aspects is needed to e.g. better understand earthquakes.
     
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