Setting Up a 12V DC Test Stand w/ Controller & Cycle Count

In summary, the conversation discusses setting up a test stand that will require a controller to cycle a device on and off at an adjustable time interval. The controller will also need to keep track of the cycle count and set a limit. The tests will typically run for 10k+ cycles, but some may go over 50k cycles. The controller will be powered by a 12V DC battery and will control one device. The desired specifications for the controller include a 12V DC battery supply, a maximum current of 6A, and a maximum power of 70W. The recommended equipment for this setup is an electronic timer, specifically the ATC Repeat Cycle Timer 422AR-100-S-0-X, which can be
  • #1
Zarathuztra
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Setting up a test stand that will need a controller to cycles a device ON and OFF at an adjustable time interval (allows me to make the ON duration and OFF duration whatever I want). It will also need to keep a count, so I can track the cycles count and also set a limit on cycles so it will stop when it reaches a certain cycle count. Tests will go normally for 10k+ cycles, but some could go over 50k cycles.

12VDC battery supply is going to go into the controller and it will be powering a 12VDC coil.

I've been trying to google but my result continuously land me to software/computer testing stuff.. Looking for some advice of recommended equipment or setups to handle the requirements. Or at least a company or website that can be a solid resource to figuring out what I need to make the controller.

Voltage: 12V DC battery
Current Max: 6A
Power Max: 70W
Frequency of cycling: likely ON/OFF 2 times a minute at the most, usually slow than that. shortest duration will be ON part of the cycles and that should be a 4 seconds at minimum.

The controller will only be controlling (1) device.
 
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  • #2
How much current how many watts are you switching on/off?

How many on/off cycles per second?

How many devices are you switching?
 
  • #3
@anorlunda : I've edited the OP to include responses to your questions.

Current Max: 6A
Power Max: 70W
Frequency of cycling: likely ON/OFF 2 times a minute at the most, usually slow than that. shortest duration will be ON part of the cycles and that should be a 4 seconds at minimum.

The controller will only be controlling (1) device.
 
  • #5
Does the device under test present a purely resistive load, or is it inductive?

Keep a close eye on the output ratings of prospective devices. It may be difficult to find a timer relay with contacts capable of handling 6 amps DC inductive, in which case the solution is to use the timer circuit to drive an appropriately rated power relay.

Thirty years ago what you've described would possibly have been built with (2) 'on delay' timer relays, a counter, and (depending upon load characteristics) a power relay.

1. TMR1 defined the 'dwell' time. Upon timeout it turned on a power relay connected to the load , and started TMR2.
2. TMR2 defined the 'on' time. Upon timeout, it incremented a counter, and opened the TMR1 coil circuit. When TMR1 dropped out so would TMR2, and began the next cycle.

Cycle time = dwell time + on time.

3. The counter would be wired to turn on a "test completed" pilot lamp, buzzer (or whatever was appropriate), and disable timer cycling after it reached count setpoint.

Several manufacturers wrapped up the TMR1/TMR2 action described above into a single, specialized timer relay featuring separately adjustable 'dwell' and 'on' times.

These days, for traditional circuits that required more than two or three discrete devices it usually costs less to use a programmable relay - also known as a 'smart' relay - along the lines of a Siemens Logo! (which I'm mentioning due to having prior experience; there are others). You can download a demo version of their Comfortsoft software which is fully functional except for upload/download capability. $250 USD buys a starter kit including fully functioning software, power supply, and 12/24 VDC controller via Allied Electronics https://www.alliedelec.com/siemens-6ed1057-3ba00-0aa8/70426747/
 
  • #6
@Asymptotic mptotic Thanks for the info. I checked Allied Electronics and it looks like they may have what I'm looking for. I'll see if they have an applications engineer available to pick a suitable option.
 

Related to Setting Up a 12V DC Test Stand w/ Controller & Cycle Count

1. What is the purpose of setting up a 12V DC test stand with a controller and cycle count?

The purpose of setting up a 12V DC test stand with a controller and cycle count is to accurately test and measure the performance and durability of electronic devices or components that run on a 12V DC power supply. The controller allows for precise control and adjustment of voltage, while the cycle count measures the number of times the device can be turned on and off before failure.

2. How do I choose the right controller for my 12V DC test stand?

When selecting a controller for your 12V DC test stand, it is important to consider factors such as voltage range, current capacity, accuracy, and control options. Make sure to choose a controller that is compatible with your power supply and has the necessary features to meet your testing requirements.

3. What is the cycle count and why is it important in a test stand?

The cycle count is the number of times a device can be turned on and off before it fails. This is an important measure of the durability and reliability of the device being tested. By tracking the cycle count, scientists can determine the lifespan of the device and identify any potential weaknesses or defects.

4. Can I use a 12V DC test stand for different types of electronic devices?

Yes, a 12V DC test stand can be used for a wide range of electronic devices, as long as they operate on a 12V DC power supply. However, it is important to ensure that the controller and cycle count settings are appropriate for the specific device being tested.

5. What are the benefits of using a 12V DC test stand with a controller and cycle count?

Using a 12V DC test stand with a controller and cycle count allows for more accurate and controlled testing of electronic devices. It also provides valuable data on the performance and durability of the devices, which can be used to improve their design and functionality. Additionally, it can save time and resources compared to manual testing methods.

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