Simple column buckling problem - pl help

In summary, a simple column buckling problem is when a slender column fails due to axial load, commonly seen in structural engineering. To solve this problem, one must calculate the critical buckling load using Euler's formula and ensure the applied load is not greater than the critical load. Various factors such as material properties, dimensions, and end supports can affect the problem. Assumptions, such as straightness and homogeneity of the column, are made when solving it. To prevent this problem, one can use larger cross-sectional areas, stronger materials, or proper bracing and support.
  • #1
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Knowing that the torsional spring is of constant K and that the rigid bar is of length L, determine the critical load [TeX]P_{cr}[/TeX] beyond which the column would buckle. See pic for the problem.
[As the spring uncurls, it applies moment [TeX]K \theta[/TeX] to the bar.]

PROB.jpg


The answer is [tex]P_{cr}=K/L[/tex]
 
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  • #2
I solved this problem.
 
  • #3
^2. In order to determine the critical load at which the column would buckle, we need to consider both the torsional spring and the rigid bar. The torsional spring applies a moment of K \theta to the bar as it uncurls, where \theta is the angular displacement of the bar. This moment is directly proportional to the stiffness of the spring, K, and the angular displacement of the bar.

To understand how this moment affects the buckling of the column, we can use Euler's buckling formula, which states that the critical load for a column is given by P_{cr}=\frac{\pi^2EI}{(KL)^2}, where E is the modulus of elasticity and I is the moment of inertia of the column.

In this case, the column is replaced by the rigid bar, and the torsional spring is equivalent to the moment applied at the top of the bar. Therefore, we can substitute the moment K \theta for P_{cr} in the formula, giving us P_{cr}=\frac{\pi^2EI}{(KL)^2}=\frac{K \theta L^2}{(KL)^2}=\frac{K}{L^2}.

This shows that the critical load for buckling is directly proportional to the stiffness of the torsional spring and inversely proportional to the square of the length of the bar. Therefore, for a longer bar or a stiffer spring, the critical load will be higher.

In conclusion, the critical load for buckling in this simple column problem can be determined by using the formula P_{cr}=K/L^2, where K is the stiffness of the torsional spring and L is the length of the rigid bar.
 

What is a simple column buckling problem?

A simple column buckling problem refers to the analysis of a slender column subjected to an axial load, which can result in the sudden failure of the column due to buckling. This is a common problem in structural engineering and is important to consider in the design of structures.

How do you solve a simple column buckling problem?

To solve a simple column buckling problem, you must first determine the critical buckling load, which is the load at which the column will buckle. This can be calculated using the Euler's buckling formula. Then, you must check if the applied load is greater than the critical buckling load. If it is, the column will buckle and fail. If not, the column is safe and will not buckle.

What are the factors that affect a simple column buckling problem?

The factors that affect a simple column buckling problem include the material properties of the column (such as its modulus of elasticity and yield strength), its dimensions (length, cross-sectional area, and moment of inertia), and the type of end supports (fixed or pinned).

What are the assumptions made in solving a simple column buckling problem?

The assumptions made in solving a simple column buckling problem include: the column is perfectly straight, the material is homogenous and isotropic, the applied load is axial and does not induce any bending, and the end supports are either perfectly fixed or perfectly pinned. These assumptions may not hold true in real-life situations, but they provide a simplified analysis of the problem.

How can I prevent a simple column buckling problem?

To prevent a simple column buckling problem, you can design the column with a larger cross-sectional area, increase its length-to-radius ratio, or use stronger materials. Additionally, providing proper bracing or support can also help prevent buckling. It is important to carefully consider all factors and loads when designing columns to prevent buckling failures.

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