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Size difference between Hydrogen ion and electron?

  1. Feb 15, 2015 #1
    While studying the generation of electricity using hydrogen fuel cells, I came across a point that

    "The electrolyte is a thin, fragile sheet of acidic, solid organic polymer about 50 microns (2 thousandths of an inch) thick which permits the passage of Hydrogen ions but is impermeable to electrons."
    So i would like to confirm that the impermeability of electrons is due to it's larger size.

    Can you please help?
    Thank you.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 15, 2015 #2

    Bystander

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  4. Feb 15, 2015 #3
    So it is because of the acidic nature of the electrolyte. Right?
     
  5. Feb 15, 2015 #4

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    The polymer cannot move, it can only ionize to protons, and immobile negatively charged, anionic functional groups. Electrostatic repulsion prevents movement of any negatively charged ions, particles, through the polymer film. The protons move through freely from one fixed anionic site to the next. There is no sorting of subatomic particles by size going on in any molecular scale structure.
     
  6. Feb 15, 2015 #5
    Thank
    Thank You Very Much.
     
  7. Feb 15, 2015 #6

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    You are quite welcome.
     
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