Solving for Maximum Height of Ball Launched at 60 Degrees

In summary, the question is asking for the maximum height reached by a metal ball shot from 60 degrees at an initial height of 128 cm and landing 86.5 cm away. The equations provided include d=v1 t + 1/2 a tsquared, v2squared = v1squared + 2ad, d= 1/2(v1 + v2)t, and a=(v2-v1) / t. The suggested method for solving involves separating the problem into the horizontal and vertical components and using the known values to solve for the unknowns. It is recommended to begin with equations that have only one unknown and then solve as a system of equations if necessary.
  • #1
meagr
1
0

Homework Statement



shot from 60 degrees 128 cm above ground, a metal ball lands 86.5 cm away.
what is max height the ball reaches?


Homework Equations



d=v1 t + 1/2 a tsquared

v2squared = v1squared + 2ad

d= 1/2(v1 + v2)t

a=(v2-v1) / t


The Attempt at a Solution



without having my initial velocity, time, i am having trouble solving for how the max height the ball will reach .
i am trying to solve the vertical displacement being the Vy and the horizontal displacement being the Vx to find out the hypotenuse of the triangle( with angels 60, 30, 90), and i am so lost. i know i have my acceleration due to gravity, and my V2y=0m/s and my angel of elevation is 60 degrees but i am so lost in figuring out max height the ball will reach because i have so many unknowns.

can anyone help?
 
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  • #2
Make two headings "horizontal" and "vertical". Write x = vt under the horizontal heading and the accelerated motion formulas under the vertical heading. Fill in all the numbers you have. Note that while you don't know the initial Vx or Vy, you do know their ratio, so enter Vx as an unknown and then Vy as Vx times a tangent. If you have only one unknown in one of the formulas, begin with that! If not, you'll have to use 2 or 3 of them and solve as a system of equations.

Show your equations here if you would like more help!
 
  • #3




To solve for the maximum height reached by the ball, we can use the equation d=v1t + 1/2at^2, where d is the vertical displacement, v1 is the initial velocity, t is the time, and a is the acceleration due to gravity. In this case, we know the initial vertical displacement (128 cm) and the final vertical displacement (0 cm), since the ball lands on the ground. We also know the initial horizontal displacement (0 cm) and the final horizontal displacement (86.5 cm). We can also determine the time it takes for the ball to reach the ground using the equation d=1/2(v1 + v2)t, where v2 is the final velocity, which is equal to the initial velocity in the horizontal direction. We can also use the equation a=(v2-v1)/t to solve for the initial velocity in the vertical direction.

Once we have all the necessary values, we can plug them into the equation d=v1t + 1/2at^2 and solve for t. Then, we can use this value of t to plug into the equation d=1/2(v1 + v2)t to solve for the initial velocity in the vertical direction. Finally, we can use this value of v1 to solve for the maximum height reached by the ball using the equation d=v1t + 1/2at^2.

It is important to note that this solution assumes that there is no air resistance and that the initial velocity is constant throughout the motion of the ball. If these assumptions do not hold, the actual maximum height reached may vary. Additionally, the angle of elevation (60 degrees) is not necessary in solving for the maximum height, as it only affects the initial velocity in the vertical direction. I hope this helps in solving for the maximum height reached by the ball.
 

Related to Solving for Maximum Height of Ball Launched at 60 Degrees

1. What is the equation for finding the maximum height of a ball launched at 60 degrees?

The equation for finding the maximum height of a ball launched at 60 degrees is given by h = (v2sin2θ) / 2g, where h is the maximum height, v is the initial velocity, θ is the launch angle, and g is the acceleration due to gravity (9.8 m/s2).

2. How do I determine the initial velocity of the ball in order to solve for the maximum height?

The initial velocity can be determined by using the equation v0 = vcosθ, where v0 is the initial velocity, v is the final velocity (which is usually 0 at the maximum height), and θ is the launch angle.

3. Can I use the same equation to find the maximum height for any launch angle?

Yes, the same equation can be used for any launch angle as long as the initial velocity and acceleration due to gravity remain constant. However, it is important to make sure that the launch angle is measured in radians, not degrees.

4. How can I verify the accuracy of my calculated maximum height?

You can verify the accuracy of your calculated maximum height by using a physics simulator or conducting an experiment. By measuring the actual maximum height of the ball and comparing it to your calculated value, you can determine the accuracy of your calculation.

5. Are there any other factors that may affect the maximum height of a ball launched at 60 degrees?

Yes, there are other factors that may affect the maximum height of a ball launched at 60 degrees, such as air resistance, wind, and the surface on which the ball is launched. These factors may slightly alter the initial velocity and trajectory of the ball, therefore affecting the maximum height. However, for most practical purposes, these factors can be ignored and the equation given in question 1 can be used.

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