Source transformations: confusing problem wording

In summary: And you can use the given current and load resistance to find the open-circuit voltage.In summary, the conversation discusses finding the open-circuit voltage of a practical dc voltage source that can provide a current of 10.5 A when short-circuited and 30 W to a 20 Ω load. The formula V=IR is mentioned and it is determined that the current entering the load would be √(3/2). The 10.5 A current when short-circuited refers to the current through the source resistance, and this information can be used to find the open-circuit voltage.
  • #1
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Homework Statement



A certain practical dc voltage source can provide a current of 10.5 A when it is (momentarily) short- circuited, and can provide of 30 W to a 20 Ω load. Find the open-circuit voltage

Homework Equations



V=IR

The Attempt at a Solution



Well I'm pretty sure that the current entering the resistor load would have to be √(3/2), but I'm not sure exactly what to do from there. I don't quite understand what is meant by the 10.5 A when short-circuited statement. Like would that be the current through the source resistance?
 
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  • #3
EngnrMatt said:

Homework Statement



A certain practical dc voltage source can provide a current of 10.5 A when it is (momentarily) short- circuited, and can provide of 30 W to a 20 Ω load. Find the open-circuit voltage

Homework Equations



V=IR

The Attempt at a Solution



Well I'm pretty sure that the current entering the resistor load would have to be √(3/2), but I'm not sure exactly what to do from there. I don't quite understand what is meant by the 10.5 A when short-circuited statement. Like would that be the current through the source resistance?
Yes on both counts. If the power source's output is shorted, the internal source resistance will be the only thing limiting the current.
 

1. What are source transformations?

Source transformations refer to a problem-solving method used in circuit analysis, where the original circuit is transformed into an equivalent circuit with simpler elements. This is often done to make the problem easier to solve or to help gain a better understanding of the circuit's behavior.

2. Why is the wording of source transformation problems confusing?

The wording of source transformation problems can be confusing because it often involves complex circuit diagrams and mathematical equations. Additionally, the problem may use different terminology or notation than what the reader is familiar with, adding to the confusion.

3. How do I know when to use a source transformation?

Source transformations are typically used when the original circuit contains multiple sources (such as voltage and current sources) and/or complex configurations. They can also be used to simplify the circuit in order to apply other circuit analysis techniques, such as nodal or mesh analysis.

4. What are the steps for performing a source transformation?

The steps for performing a source transformation may vary depending on the specific problem, but generally involve replacing a voltage source with a series combination of a resistor and current source, or replacing a current source with a parallel combination of a resistor and voltage source. It is important to use the correct source transformation equations and to carefully redraw the transformed circuit for accuracy.

5. How can I improve my understanding of source transformations?

To improve your understanding of source transformations, it is important to have a strong foundation in circuit analysis principles and techniques. Practice solving various types of source transformation problems and refer to reliable resources for guidance. Additionally, seeking help from a tutor or instructor can also be beneficial in improving your understanding of this concept.

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