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Featured B Space Stuff and Launch Info

  1. Feb 12, 2018 #476
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2018
  2. Mar 6, 2018 #477

    OmCheeto

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    This "anniversary" photo popped up in my twitter feed this morning:

    shuttle.atomic.oxygen.glow.Sts062-42-026.png
    March 6, 1994
    STS-62
    Atomic oxygen glow around the rear section of the space shuttle.
    [refs: wiki Day 3, NASA Day three???? see below]

    NASA STS-62
    Launch March 4, 1994; 8:53:01am EST
    On Flight Day Three (Sunday, March 3, 1994)
    Flight Day 4 began Monday, March 7, 1994 at 12:53 a.m.

    It would appear, that those rocket scientists, can make typos, also.
    Either that, or they've been doing time travel experiments. :oldsurprised:
     
  3. Mar 6, 2018 #478

    OmCheeto

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    Weird coincidence? This just popped up in my Facebook feed:

    AirglowRings_Wang_1080.jpg
    APOD, 2016.03.06
    Colorful Airglow Bands Surround Milky Way
    Image Credit & Copyright: Xiaohan Wang

    Is it "Atomic glow day", or something?
     
  4. Mar 10, 2018 #479

    nsaspook

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    https://spectrum.ieee.org/tech-talk...tealthy-startup-of-launching-rogue-satellites
     
  5. Mar 10, 2018 #480

    JMz

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    You nailed it, IMO!
     
  6. Mar 13, 2018 #481
  7. Mar 14, 2018 #482
  8. Mar 14, 2018 #483

    JMz

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    Well, there is some evidence that dying people can hang on until some date or event occurs that is especially meaningful to them. E.g., Muslims & Ramadan: Since, over time, Ramadan occurs throughout the year, it's possible to control for seasonal effects. (However, that's a finding of many years ago, so it's possible that it's been disproven since.)
     
  9. Mar 14, 2018 #484
    What about being born (i.e. Hawking) on Galileo's death date? [Jan 8] (Another Physicist's coincidence, I guess ...)
     
  10. Mar 15, 2018 #485

    JMz

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    I don't believe he had much choice about that. But it's a nice one, to be sure!
     
  11. Mar 19, 2018 #486
  12. Mar 19, 2018 #487

    mfb

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    That is unfortunate, but not too tragic. It surpassed its goals by a huge margin. Even the K2 mission alone would have been great. In 2013, as the critical reaction wheel failed, someone wanted to put the whole German Wikipedia article into the past ("was a space telescope") and so on. See how much it discovered since then!
    Kepler revolutionized our knowledge about exoplanets, and lead the way to the next-generation telescopes.

    We don't have to wait long: TESS will be launched April 16th. CHEOPS will be launched towards the end of the year. While TESS should find more planets than Kepler did, the focus is now on measuring their properties instead of just collecting them.
     
  13. Mar 26, 2018 #488

    mfb

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  14. Mar 27, 2018 #489

    mfb

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  15. Mar 27, 2018 #490

    JMz

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    :-( (There is no button for "Thanks for the post, but I regret the content of what you posted.")
     
  16. Apr 1, 2018 #491
  17. Apr 16, 2018 #492

    mfb

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    TESS will be launched on Wednesday 22:51 UTC (time zone reference: this post was made Tuesday 01:25 UTC).
    Originally it was planned for Monday, but an issue with the guidance system delayed it for two days.

    It is the successor to the Kepler mission. It is expected to find more than 20,000 planets (as comparison: we currently know about 3800) - most of them much larger than Earth, but 500-2000 should be roughly Earth-sized, many of them in the habitable zone around their star. TESS targets bright stars, which means they will all be accessible to follow-up observations with other telescopes to confirm their existence, to measure their mass, to look for atmospheres and so on.

    The Falcon 9 rocket launch of the satellite could be interesting as well. Apart from the usual livestream (including landing the first stage on the barge) Elon Musk tweeted "SpaceX will try to bring rocket upper stage back from orbital velocity using a giant party balloon". The second stage was expected to leave Earth orbit permanently, but entering the atmosphere again is easy as well. Surviving the reentry, on the other hand...

    Edit: Hans: The second stage will not be de-orbited on this mission but it will be put in a hyperbolic disposal orbit.
    I guess Musk's comment applies to future missions, not TESS.



    Also upcoming: Gaia's second data release (April 25). A total of 1.7 billion sources. 1.3 of them with positions, parallaxes and proper motion together with some other basic parameters. It should allow a re-calibration of the whole cosmic distance ladder, and should resolve a couple of puzzles about stellar distances.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2018
  18. Apr 21, 2018 #493
    I love this photo of the TESS rockets. That fuel is beautiful!

    DbVxmhvVMAEWz42.jpg
     
  19. Apr 22, 2018 #494
    ... as long as you're not nearby! :nb):smile:
     
  20. Apr 29, 2018 #495

    mfb

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    Blue Origin is preparing a new launch of New Shepard in a few minutes.

    Livestream

    New Shepard is a fully reusable suborbital rocket and the rocket (the individual object!) made several flights already. While it is planned to launch humans to space in the capsule, New Shepard is also the precursor to New Glenn, a partially reusable orbital rocket with a planned maiden flight in 2020. It will be quite similar to Falcon 9, but larger and potentially a bit cheaper.
     
  21. Apr 29, 2018 #496
    Maybe I am wrong but it seems like Blue Origin is trailing SpaceX? I find this surprising considering Bezos insane fortune.
     
  22. Apr 30, 2018 #497

    mfb

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    He invests about $1 billion per year in the company. The approach is different - Blue Origin is behind but we don't know how much.
    SpaceX started with a (relatively) small amount of money and no big investor backing it; they had to launch stuff to space quickly to get funding, and they still have to launch things while developing upgrades and new rockets at the same time.
    Blue Origin has basically unlimited funding. They can directly develop a big, partially reusable orbital rocket, with just some tests (New Shepard) on the way. If their planned launch date of 2020 holds they will have something comparable to Falcon Heavy, just 2-3 years later.
     
  23. May 11, 2018 #498

    mfb

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    7 minutes until the maiden flight of Falcon 9 Block 5.

    Livestream

    The final iteration of the rocket, made for much easier reuse. The booster is supposed to be able to fly up to 100 times, with 10-20 flights being a more typical number, and without refurbishment between flights. At least one individual booster is planned to fly 10 times until the end of next year to demonstrate this capability, and a reflight within 24 hours is planned as well. Launching a new booster will become the exception for SpaceX.

    It is the first large satellite for Bangladesh.

    Edit: The booster did its job, now it will land on the drone ship while the second stage proceeds to orbit. This particular booster will be taken apart to confirm in detail that taking apart Block 5 boosters is not necessary.
    Edit2: The booster has landed! The second stage made it to the planned temporary orbit, in about 20 minutes it will make another burn to geostationary transfer orbit.
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2018
  24. May 17, 2018 #499
    Past worldwide experience in developing large rocket engines is that they take at least a few years to develop, no matter how large a pile of $$$ you throw at the problem.
     
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