Strain Gauge Tutorial: Selection & Tradeoffs

In summary, this conversation discussed a tutorial on strain gauges and the tradeoffs that come with using different sizes. It also mentioned a helpful document on strain gauge selection and shared a test specimen made with a strain gauge. The conversation concluded with appreciation for the helpful information provided.
  • #1
Cyrus
3,238
17
This is a very good little tutorial on how to use strain gauges and the tradeoffs found by using different sizes.


http://www.abacus.co.uk/jkcm/cache/fl0008816.jpg


http://signalprocessing.prosig.com/FatigueTesting/strain-gauge-close.jpg​
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http://www.vishay.com/strain-gages/knowledge-base-list/technotes-list/

This one is a particularly good general purpose strain gauge document:

Strain Gage Selection (TN-505)
 
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  • #2
I made a test specimen to measure uniaxial force. It's basically a long strip of .75mm aluminum. The area reduction at the test section was made such that adequate strain is available to make measurements. The filet was made to accommodate the reduction in area. The gauge length was such that the stress dissipates (due to Saint-Venant's principle) by the time it gets to the strain gauge. The test specimen was made on a end mill.

http://img187.imageshack.us/img187/2460/pict0381tn9.jpg

I probably should have chamfered the edges, but it isn't going to change anything and not worth the time and effort.
 
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  • #3


Thanks for sharing this tutorial on strain gauges! I found it very informative and helpful. It's interesting to see the tradeoffs that come with using different sizes of strain gauges. The images you provided really helped me understand the concepts better. I also appreciate the link to the Vishay strain gauge selection document - it seems like a great resource for anyone looking to use strain gauges in their projects. Keep sharing useful information like this!
 

Related to Strain Gauge Tutorial: Selection & Tradeoffs

1. What is a strain gauge and how does it work?

A strain gauge is a sensor used to measure the strain or deformation of a material. It works by converting the physical changes in a material into electrical signals, which can then be measured and analyzed.

2. How do I select the right strain gauge for my application?

Selecting the right strain gauge depends on several factors such as the type of material being measured, the expected strain range, and the environmental conditions. It is important to carefully consider these factors and consult with a strain gauge supplier for expert advice.

3. What are the tradeoffs when choosing a strain gauge?

Some common tradeoffs when choosing a strain gauge include sensitivity, accuracy, temperature stability, and cost. For example, a highly sensitive strain gauge may be more expensive but will provide more precise measurements.

4. Can I use a strain gauge for dynamic measurements?

Yes, strain gauges can be used for dynamic measurements, but it is important to select a strain gauge with a high frequency response and consider the effects of temperature changes and mechanical stress on the measurement accuracy.

5. How do I properly install a strain gauge for accurate measurements?

Proper installation of a strain gauge is crucial for accurate measurements. It is important to follow the manufacturer's instructions and ensure the strain gauge is securely bonded to the material being measured. Additionally, proper wiring and conditioning of the electrical signals are necessary for accurate readings.

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