The Best & Worst Places To Live

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  • #1
SOS2008
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In watching the many programs on the Science channel about natural disasters, such as an asteroid that is heading toward Earth, then last night the program about Yellowstone and Super Volcanoes, and after that the "Journey to Planet Earth" series on PBS, I find a process of thought as follows:

The asteroid and Super Volcano not only are not likely in my lifetime, but if either did happen there is not a best place to be when it happens. Then with regard to predictions of another earth quake and mega Tsunami I think we better evacuate the Northwest PF HQ. But with global warming and rising water levels, I think I'm glad I'm not living in a low-lying coastal city like NY, Washington DC, Miami, etc. But before that happens there will be heat waves, and I think I better get out of this desert, but where to, and with overpopulation, where will there be water? So before I start looking for a job somewhere and putting my home up for sale, what are other PF member's thoughts on this?
 

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  • #2
Ivan Seeking
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I think most of these problems are too long term to concern yourself with for any immediate decisions. I certainly wouldn't buy a home on the beach or near a river. And I wouldn't build a home on a 100 year flood plain. Aside from that, the biggest real threat that I see is terrorism in the big cities. But even then, the odds of dying in an auto accident make that the greatest real threat of all. So I suggest that you keep your brakes serviced, keep good tires, wear your selt belt, and drive carefully to your new home of choice. :biggrin:
 
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  • #3
I live in NY so I'll probably see that killer tidal wave, earthquake, etc.. when I'm in heaven
 
  • #4
SOS2008
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I knew I could count on you Ivan, but are you sure I don't have to worry about more record temperatures in coming summers--maybe at least put a little aside for my A/C bill in the meantime? Invest in Pioneer Hybrid? (Okay, maybe I just wanted an excuse to build a cabin up north, and I was hoping to get PF members to help out...)

Some more things on my mind...

1) Is dual citizenship allowed in the US? (Just wondering...)
2) Should I change my PF name? If so, please make suggestions. (Or maybe I should just use a symbol with formerly SOS underneath?)
3) Olives have been dropping off my olive tree like crazy this year. I wonder if these could be processed for consumption...?
4) Should I get back to work? Yes!

Thanks!
 
  • #5
Ivan Seeking
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SOS2008 said:
I knew I could count on you Ivan, but are you sure I don't have to worry about more record temperatures in coming summers--maybe at least put a little aside for my A/C bill in the meantime? Invest in Pioneer Hybrid? (Okay, maybe I just wanted an excuse to build a cabin up north, and I was hoping to get PF members to help out...)

Some more things on my mind...

1) Is dual citizenship allowed in the US? (Just wondering...)
2) Should I change my PF name? If so, please make suggestions. (Or maybe I should just use a symbol with formerly SOS underneath?)
3) Olives have been dropping off my olive tree like crazy this year. I wonder if these could be processed for consumption...?
4) Should I get back to work? Yes!

Thanks!

Hey, I'm all for a cabin in the North - we did that you know [not a cabin but close enough, and not Canada, but Oregon]. And yes, dual citizenship is allowed. As for local variations in temperature as a function of global warming, I don't know how significant this will be in the next two decades, but it is not likely to be significant in terms of sensible temperure differences. From what I gather, we can expect more warmer days and stronger and more frequent storms. But I am very concerned about the next generation of kids and the world they will be handed.
 
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  • #6
Informal Logic
I've seen that series Journey to Planet Earth too. It can be a bit depressing, though the real intent is to make people aware of environment issues, etc. (assuming people watch channels like PBS is large enough numbers?). What did impress me was that of illegal immigration, and how this recent and ever increasing number of people flooding into the high-tech environment of the US is adding to the number of people emitting the largest amount of greenhouse gases.--That's one I hadn't thought about before. Also with regard to water resources, the rivers of South America are the largest source of water, but unfortunately the most inaccessible to ever growing populations.
 
  • #7
Danger
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SOS2008 said:
So before I start looking for a job somewhere and putting my home up for sale, what are other PF member's thoughts on this?
There's still that imaginatively decorated corner of my basement, if you have no serious aversion to a trapeze and an iron maiden. :wink:
You know you're always welcome. :tongue2:
 
  • #8
Ivan Seeking
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Did your girlfriend pop?

I told you not to use so much air pressure. :biggrin:
 
  • #9
Danger
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Ivan Seeking said:
Did your girlfriend pop?

I told you not to use so much air pressure. :biggrin:
It wasn't the pressure; I forgot to swap in the rubber spikes. :frown:
 
  • #10
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Maybe if you acclimate yourself to a harsh environment now it won't be as difficult to cope if the world goes topsy turvy. Build a house on Ayers Rock in AUS and live there summers, and keep a yurt on the Mongolian plains in the summer. Take weekend trips to the Gobi with your family and gather water from condensation on plastic sheets in the morning. Then when the supervolcano happens it will be like a walk in the park.

Huck
 
  • #11
SOS2008
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Danger said:
There's still that imaginatively decorated corner of my basement...
Hmm, lets see. A basement year around or a few months of heat wave, a basement or a heat wave...
Huckleberry said:
Maybe if you acclimate yourself to a harsh environment now it won't be as difficult to cope if the world goes topsy turvy. Build a house on Ayers Rock in AUS and live there summers, and keep a yurt on the Mongolian plains in the summer. Take weekend trips to the Gobi with your family and gather water from condensation on plastic sheets in the morning. Then when the supervolcano happens it will be like a walk in the park.

Huck
:rofl: You know, I have a similar theory called "dirt theory" based on the belief that one should be exposed to germs to keep the immune system strong. What shall we call your theory? Hmm...Accelerated Evolution?
 
  • #12
SOS2008
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Ivan Seeking said:
Did your girlfriend pop?

I told you not to use so much air pressure. :biggrin:
:rofl:

Right...look who's talking. Set Tsu free, set Tsu free! Hey, maybe she could help with my cabin--Tsu, I'll have green apple martinis... :biggrin:

I'll take it no one knows about olives...
 
  • #13
Evo
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SOS2008 said:
1) Is dual citizenship allowed in the US? (Just wondering...)
I'm a dual national. If I disappear in the next few days, you'll know it's not ok. :uhh:
 
  • #14
Evo
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SOS2008 said:
I'll take it no one knows about olives...
Hey, I watched a show on the Food Network about brining/curing olives and making oil. :wink:

We could make some great dirty martinis. :tongue2:
 
  • #15
SOS2008
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Evo said:
I'm a dual national. If I disappear in the next few days, you'll know it's not ok. :uhh:
:rofl: I thought so about the citizenship. We've already had the "Three Faces of Evo," and now we have "Saving Evo" or maybe "Finding Evo?" (I'm still working on a symbol for my new name... :tongue: I should ask the folks in physics if there is anything to represent demented thinking--oh wait, that would be Moonbear.)
 
  • #16
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SOS2008 said:
:rofl: You know, I have a similar theory called "dirt theory" based on the belief that one should be exposed to germs to keep the immune system strong. What shall we call your theory? Hmm...Accelerated Evolution?

Dirt theory sounds good to me. Does that mean I shouldn't take a shower?
umm, maybe climactic conditioning. No that's not a theory.
maybe just the yurt theory. Can't forget it that way.

Huck
 
  • #17
Ivan Seeking
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SOS2008 said:
I'll take it no one knows about olives...

I can tell you alllllll about olives. I once lived in the olive capitol of something or other...north of Sacramento. When I moved there I was told to try a fresh olive, right off the tree; Mmmmmmm . If you've never tried one, you haven't lived!

:rolleyes:

Edit: okay really, don't try it.
 
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  • #18
Ivan Seeking
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Oh yes, based on my experience in the valley, olives seem to like the daily high temp around 140 degrees F.
 
  • #19
Danger
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SOS2008 said:
Hmm, lets see. A basement year around or a few months of heat wave, a basement or a heat wave...
Yeah... but a basement with an iron maiden! :tongue2:

Evo said:
I'm a dual national.
What's the other one...?

SOS2008 said:
I should ask the folks in physics if there is anything to represent demented thinking--oh wait, that would be Moonbear.)
:rofl: :approve:

Ivan Seeking said:
olives seem to like the daily high temp around 140 degrees F.
No wonder Popeye always looks so sweaty.
 
  • #20
Ivan Seeking
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Curing Olives

Lye treated green olives - This recipe courtesy U.C. Davis publication

A. Lye treatment - lye can be purchased at hardware stores. Don't use an aluminum pot or it will leach out the zinc

1. Soak 12 hours in lye solution - 4 tablespoons lye in 1 gallon cold water. (Solution should not be over 64 to 70 F before adding olives.) stir occasionally.

2. Drain, and soak 12 more hours in fresh lye solution. Cut into a large olive - lye will change the flesh to a yellow-green, penetrating to the pit.

1. If the lye has not penetrated to the pit, soak an additional 12 hours in a fresh lye solution.

B. Rinse

1. Rinse in cold water

2. Soak 6 hours in fresh, cold water.

1. Change the water and soak 6 hours in fresh cold water, repeating four times a day for 4-8 days, until there is no lye taste

C. Preservation

To keep up to 2 weeks:

1. Brine cure l. Cover with salt brine - 6 tablespoons salt per gallon of water. Let stand 2 days. Refrigerate and use within 2 weeks.

To keep longer than 2 weeks:

2. Brine cure ll.

1. Step 1. Cover with salt brine - 13 tablespoons salt per gallon of water. Store 1 week.

2. Step 2. Cover with fresh salt brine - 1 pound or 1 2/3 cups salt per gallon of water. Store in a cool place, preferably a refrigerator. Use within 2-4 months. Before eating, soak olives overnight to remove excess salt. Use with 3 days after soaking.

3. Pickling. Prepare a vinegar-water solution - equal parts vinegar and water. Add salt to the vinegar-water solution: ½ to 1-cup salt per gallon - do not omit salt as it prevents bacterial growth. Add garlic an spices if desired. Cover tightly and store at room temperature. Good for 4-5 months at room temperature or 10-12 months in the refrigerator.

Green Olives (and half ripe ones)

Any variety - Collect olives by hand in a clean plastic bucket to
prevent bruising.
Day O Wash in running water. Add boiling hot water and allow to soak for 24 hours.
Day 1 Pour of cold water add more boiling water
Day 2 Pour of cold water add more boiling water
Day 3 Pour of cold water. Place the olives into clean jars. add a mixture of brine and white (or any other type) vinegar in the proportions of 3 to 1 by volume

Brine = 10%w/v salt in water that is 100grams/litre of final solution

Fill jars well and add a layer of olive oil.

We eat the olives by both methods after one week. When the olives are at
their tastiest they have all gone!


Oil Cured Greek Style Olives

This is one of several recipes from U.C. Davis publication 2758 - Home Pickling of Olives. Go to "Books" for ordering information

It is usually best to prepare Greek-style olives from mature olives that are dark-red to black. Mission olives are commonly used, but any variety will do. Use smaller olives because larger ones get soft. The olives will become shriveled since they are salt cured. These olives are salty and slightly bitter, and you may have to acquire a taste for them.

How To Prepare

Cover the bottom of a wooden box with burlap. Weigh out 1 pound of salt for each 2 pounds of olives. Mix the salt and olives well in the box to prevent mold from developing. Pour a layer of salt over the olives to a depth of 1 inch. CAUTION Place the box outdoors so that the brine formed will not ruin the floor.

After 1 week, pour olives and salt into another box, then back into the first box to mix them. Repeat this mixing process once every 3 days until the olives are cured and edible. This usually takes about 30 to 35 days.

Sift out most of the salt through a screen. Dip the olives momentarily in boiling water. Drain. Let them dry overnight.

Add 1 pound of salt to each 10 pounds of olives. Mix and put the olives in a cool place. Use within 1 month, or store in a refrigerator or home freezer until used. Just before using, coat the olives with olive oil. Do not use oil if you plan to use the olives for cooking. To coat with oil, put them in a large pan or box and sprinkle a little olive oil over them. Work the olives with your hands to coat them with oil. This type of olive is useful for flavoring stews, tamale pie, spaghetti, and as a relish eaten out-of-hand.

Black Olives

Day O Wash in running water. Place in flat trays (large surface area)
or plastic ice cream containers. Add boiling hot water and allow to soak for 24 hours.
Day 1 Remove cold water and add dry salt
day 2 Onwards - mix well and keep adding dry salt
After about a week water comes out of the olives - pour off
Total salt = about 15% OF THE OLIVE WEIGHT IE 150 To 200 grams
Test - wash salt off olive and taste. When the salt has penetrate into the olive, wash off salt and add olive oil.

http://lolivier-sonoma.com/mediacenter/1112.htm [Broken]
 
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  • #21
SOS2008
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Evo said:
Hey, I watched a show on the Food Network about brining/curing olives and making oil. :wink:

We could make some great dirty martinis. :tongue2:
I don't know where you're from, but you're welcome at my place! :biggrin:
Ivan Seeking said:
I can tell you alllllll about olives. I once lived in the olive capitol of something or other...north of Sacramento. When I moved there I was told to try a fresh olive, right off the tree; Mmmmmmm . If you've never tried one, you haven't lived!

:rolleyes:

Edit: okay really, don't try it.
I heard olives are bitter, so have not tried one. But the birds sure love 'em (poopin' on the patio again I see...). Oh I gotta tell you this one. I was leaving a client site one day and a very large bird pooped on me--all in my hair and on my arm. Fortunately it was the end of the day so I just went straight home to shower. I swear, bird poop instantly dries like concrete when it's 110 degrees. I told the client about the incident, and he had a good laugh...until he got pooped on a couple of weeks later. Uh-hum -- now spikes are installed on that ledge.

(Oops, this isn't the "digress" thread--I've thread jacked my own thread!)
 
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  • #22
Ivan Seeking
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One note about curing olives: You make mistake, you die!

Edit: Curing olives is a bit like preparing blowfish.
 
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  • #23
Danger
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SOS2008 said:
I was leaving a client sight one day and a very large bird pooped on me--all in my hair and on my arm.
I'm beginning to doubt my original appraisal of you as a stodgy, highly dignified businesswoman.

SOS2008 said:
(Oops, this isn't the "digress" thread--I've thread jacked my own thread!)
:rofl: That'll teach you to pay attention. Don't worry, though. I'm sure someone else will come along and take it away from you again.
 
  • #24
Evo
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Danger said:
Evo said:
I'm a dual national.
What's the other one...?
French.

Ok, we need to do away with this minimum post length, this is annoying. :grumpy:
 
  • #25
Danger
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Evo said:
French.
A clue, perhaps, to your fascination with sword-swallowing? :wink: :biggrin: :tongue2:

Evo said:
Ok, we need to do away with this minimum post length, this is annoying. :grumpy:
I was going to ask you what that's for. It really is a serious irritation.
 

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