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The Quark thread

  1. May 28, 2006 #1

    Mk

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    The "Quark" thread

    The "Quark" thread seemed to have been indiscriminately locked (I appreciate a last post to say why). I still have question about quarks. From what marlon and arivero said, it sounds like quarks have not been "seen." Is this so?

    Why does the color force and strong force increase in strength at a distance? This seems to be the opposite of common sense, but its quantum physics.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 28, 2006 #2
    Last edited: May 28, 2006
  4. May 30, 2006 #3

    Meir Achuz

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  5. May 30, 2006 #4

    Meir Achuz

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    Almost the earliest force you played with as a child increased with strength at a distance. (Think rubber band.)
     
  6. May 31, 2006 #5

    arivero

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    Well, they do not increase, they just do not decrease.

    For a constante force the energy increases, because it is force times lenght.

    the difference between electricity and colour is that force carriers (the gluons) are charged themselves, while photons are neutral.
     
  7. May 31, 2006 #6

    Gokul43201

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    [being a little glib]Does the restoring force of a spring seem counterintuitive too ?
     
  8. May 31, 2006 #7
    Well, I could be wrong here, but I thought I heard somewhere that it DOES increase with distance due to interaction with the virtual particles in vacuum space(not talking about rubber bands or springs here, of course!)
     
  9. Jun 1, 2006 #8

    arivero

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    To be honest, QCD as a problem of eigenstates is not solved yet. So people uses models (or approximations) where the potential increases or models where the force increases, but just the former (the increasing of potential) is enough to get models of confinement.
     
  10. Jun 1, 2006 #9

    Meir Achuz

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    I think this is a minor confusion of language between you and arrivero.
    The belief is that long distance q-q force is constant.
    This corresponds to a linear increase in the potential energy.
    The force is confining, like a spring or rubber band, but does not have a quadratic potential like them.
     
  11. Jun 2, 2006 #10
    We know that a level Teaspoon of Neutrons weighs a billion tons but what does a level Teaspoon of Top Quarks weigh?
     
  12. Jun 2, 2006 #11

    arivero

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    I didn't know. For instance a teaspoon of sugar gets one half of its weight from neutrons.
     
  13. Jun 2, 2006 #12

    Meir Achuz

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    The top quark is about 200 times heavier than a neutron.
    But, while the neutron has a radius of about .8 fm, the top quark could be a point particle so it depends on what you consider a teaspoon of tops.
    Anyway, "teaspoon" is not an SI unit, and is not allowed in textbooks.
     
  14. Jul 28, 2006 #13
    how are quarks formed and why do they decay?
     
  15. Jul 28, 2006 #14
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