The source of the dust in Martian dust storms

In summary, the article "IDing Mars' Dust" by Dale Keiger in Johns Hopkins Magazine discusses the research of Assistant Professor Kevin Lewis and postdoctoral fellow Lujendra Ojha on the source and composition of Martian dust. The researchers have identified a large sedimentary unit, the Medusae Fossae Formation, as a potential source for Martian dust based on its high abundance of sulfur and chlorine. This new information will aid in our understanding of the Martian atmosphere and inform future missions to the planet.
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Buzz Bloom

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I cite the source article in the main body of this post. The article says that the Medusae Fossae Formation (MFF), a unique Martian geological feature, is the source of the dust which has spread over all of Mars that the robot rovers have visited. The Martian dust is actually a silt much finer than any dust on Earth, and its chemistry matches that of the MFF.
The article I first read which discusses this topic is:
"IDing Mars' Dust" by Dale Keiger​
Johns Hopkins Magazine​
Volume 70, Number 4, Winter 2018​
Page 20​
The principle researchers are Assistant Professor Kevin Lewis of Earth and planetary sciences in the Krieger School, and postdoctoral fellow Lujendra Ojha.

I was able to track down a Nature journal article.

Here is the abstract.
Transport of fine-grained dust is one of the most widespread sedimentary processes occurring on Mars today. In the present climate, eolian abrasion and deflation of rocks are likely the most pervasive and active dust-forming mechanism. Martian dust is globally enriched in S and Cl and has a distinct mean S:Cl ratio. Here we identify a potential source region for Martian dust based on analysis of elemental abundance data. We show that a large sedimentary unit called the Medusae Fossae Formation (MFF) has the highest abundance of S and Cl, and provides the best chemical match to surface measurements of Martian dust. Based on volume estimates of the eroded materials from the MFF, along with the enrichment of elemental S and Cl, and overall geochemical similarity, we propose that long-term deflation of the MFF has significantly contributed to the global Martian dust reservoir.​

I should have been able to read this sooner, but the issue of Johns Hopkins Magazine has been buried in a pile of magazines for two years.
 
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This article sheds light on the potential source and composition of Martian dust, which is critical for our understanding of the Martian atmosphere and environment. It is exciting to see how the researchers have been able to identify a specific location on Mars that could be contributing significantly to the global Martian dust reservoir. This research will help inform future missions to Mars and increase our knowledge about the planet.
 

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