Trigonometric identities for integral problem

  • Thread starter student85
  • Start date
  • #1
138
0

Homework Statement


I have this integral to solve:
[tex]\int[/tex] [tex]\frac{ab}{a^2 cos^2 t + b^2 sin^2 t}[/tex] dt

The limits are 0 to 2*pi.

Homework Equations





The Attempt at a Solution


I've tried using trigonometric identities, trigonometric substitution... and many kinds of algebraic manipulations but I can't do it! I'm beginning to think it can't be done analytically but I doubt it because my professor wants us to prove it is equal to something else which I found is 2*pi. I used my calculator to do the integration and I did get 2*pi, so at least I know what it is equal to. However I don't seem to get anywhere trying to solve it. Please help!

Thanks.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
334
0


It looks like latex is acting up (maybe just for me?). You might want to just write out the code. Most of us will be able to read it anyhow.
 
  • #3
138
0


I think if you click over the red text you see the latex code. Anyway here it is...
So it's an integral of: {ab} / {a^2 cos^2 t + b^2 sin^2 t} with respect to t.
From t=0 to 2*pi
 
  • #4
138
0


Nevermind, I solved the problem.
 

Related Threads on Trigonometric identities for integral problem

  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
1K
Replies
9
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
2K
Replies
3
Views
515
Replies
1
Views
1K
Replies
11
Views
579
Replies
2
Views
741
Replies
1
Views
1K
Top