1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Triple Integral For Moment Of Inertia

  1. Apr 18, 2009 #1

    Air

    User Avatar

    I have general question which need to be answered before I can understand steps which I have to do. There are:

    • When you are told that a solid is bounded by the coordinate plane and the plane [tex]x+10y + 2z = 5[/tex], are the limits considered to be [tex]0-1[/tex] for [tex]x[/tex]-axis, [tex]0-10[/tex] for the [tex]y[/tex]-axis and [tex]0-2[/tex] for the [tex]z[/tex] axis. What is the [tex]=5[/tex] used for in this question?
    • If you are told that the density is directly proportional to the distance from the [tex]y-z[/tex] axis, does that mean that the density is [tex]kx[/tex]?
    Could you help clear my mind? Thanks in advance.
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2009
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 18, 2009 #2
    Draw a picture. The solid in question is tetrahedral in shape, while the limits you give describe a rectangular brick. The equation they gave describes a plane with normal vector (1, 10, 2) that intersects the axes at the points (5, 0, 0), (0, 1/2, 0) and (0, 0, 5/2). Have you taken multivariable calculus yet?

    Did they say y-z axis, y=z axis or yz-plane ? I'm not sure what they could mean by y-z axis.
     
  4. Apr 18, 2009 #3

    Air

    User Avatar

    Yes, I've taken multivariable calculus. I understand the further process to work out the moment of inertia but the limits and the density function that I have to insert confuses me.

    Sorry for the confusion. It said [tex]y-z[/tex] plane.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Triple Integral For Moment Of Inertia
Loading...