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TV based education instead of Human teachers?

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  1. Sep 20, 2017 #1
    I have thinking about this issue quite a lot recently; Imagine a class of students where students don't ask any questions to teacher; All of the communication is only from teacher to students. ( I myself have attended such classes when I was a student.) In such class why teacher can not be replaced by TV playing pre-recorded video of lecture?. TV can be a big size, high resolution TV giving life like images. In the video, there can a FAQ section thus nullifying the need for students to ask the question. This will bring down the costs of education drastically at the same time giving worlds best education to the masses.
     
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  3. Sep 20, 2017 #2

    Orodruin

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    This seems like a rather failed class. Either on the part of the students (for not asking) or the lecturer (for not allowing it) or both.

    Why would you need to gather the students in one room for this? What is happening today is teachers experimenting with pre-recorded lectures making them available for students on-demand. Also there is no requirement to have two hour long lectures in this way. Student attention diminishes after 10 minutes, so the lectures need to be interactive and preferably have tasks for students to complete in between lectures.

    This does not eliminate the teacher-student interaction part. However, it allows the time when students have access to the teacher to be used in a more effective way, such as direct interaction with questions and problem solving.
     
  4. Sep 20, 2017 #3

    DrClaude

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    You're basically describing a MOOC.

    I think that the biggest problem with prerecorded lectures is attention. It is easier to concentrate an actual human being in the same room than one on screen. Also, the ability the ask questions during the lecture is also useful.
     
  5. Sep 20, 2017 #4
    Is already (sort of) happening. I'm relatively new to Academia after spending a career in Industry. I am experiencing a strong push, if not a coercive directive, from Administrators, to develop more & more online classes.

    Granted, the online classes must follow certain formats and guidelines in an attempt to maintain consistent delivery and quality. But is always difficult to do for heavier Engineering courses. Feedback from students indicate that online courses are not so good or effective. Even with email, virtual office hours, etc., students still do not get a chance for immediate clarification and rapid test-and-feedback opportunities. And the prep required to launch an effective online experience is daunting.

    Being the industry-skewed cynic that I am, I see this push for online as a method of maintaining the revenue stream and enhance operating funds (known as "profits" in Industry) in the Academic game. Use the power of the internet to de-emphasize the bricks-and-mortar paradigm of education. Do more with less. Generate more revenue by broadcasting the same course to many over the internet, not a couple dozen in a physical classroom. But I wonder if the quality of information transferral and learning is suffering.
     
  6. Sep 20, 2017 #5

    Andy Resnick

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    This is a logical fallacy. It's attractive to people who know very little about teaching and learning, but any instructor knows that learning is not a passive one-way conversation.
     
  7. Sep 20, 2017 #6

    ISamson

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    In my opinion you learn tons more from live lectures, because you can interrupt the teacher or professor with a question, which might not be in the FAQ section. It is just more satisfying and you learn much more!
    A teacher could also grab the students' attention as required.
     
  8. Sep 20, 2017 #7
    I think learning from online course on a laptop at home will be a very different experience compared to old fashion classroom along with other students to interact with only difference being teacher replaced by high-quality TV. I am also thinking of a humanoid robot with life like hand gestures and facial expressions to replace human. The only problem will be once again this can not be interactive. Students will benefit from talking to other students, can socialize, learn social skills just like a real school.
     
  9. Sep 20, 2017 #8

    symbolipoint

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    This needs three more LIKEs.
     
  10. Sep 20, 2017 #9

    symbolipoint

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    That reminds me of those webpage based online help&technical support systems which use an automated chat system to stupidly ask people for clarification about what they want to ask and then give bad answers which do not give the results of what the person has been asking.
     
  11. Sep 20, 2017 #10

    DS2C

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    Online classes are actually not cheap at all. I took a Psychology class last semester and it was ~$400 more than in seat.
     
  12. Sep 20, 2017 #11
    Kids learning from video tape should be a last resort if our country is low on budget.
     
  13. Sep 20, 2017 #12

    jtbell

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    Video tape? What's that? :oldconfused: :oldwink:
     
  14. Sep 20, 2017 #13
    I've seen distance learning done well and I've seen it done poorly. There's a lot more to it than replacing the lectures with videos. There are both challenges and opportunities. Since a computer is most likely involved in delivery of distance learning courses, there is a lot of opportunity to integrate and leverage technology.

    But as many have mentioned, the ability to interact with a real live person and get questions answered is one key to a good course. But most of my focus in either (distance or in person) is how the student is actively engaged in problem solving. The point of any lecture, video, or presentation is to give them the tools and equip them to grow into success as they actively engage in problem solving. If the students cannot solve the problems, how well they can parrot back talking points from the lecture is irrelevant, learning has not occurred.
     
  15. Sep 20, 2017 #14

    Orodruin

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    This. What the teacher does is not the important issue. What matters is what the students do. If you have walked into a traditional lecture where students were attentively taking notes and at peak concentration for two hours, learning everything the teacher said without any other effort on their part - then you were probably dreaming.
     
  16. Sep 20, 2017 #15

    symbolipoint

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    Interesting! So this new way to deliver education is how colleges can pull more money from students.
     
  17. Sep 20, 2017 #16

    DS2C

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    Seems to be accurate. At my campus all tests (aside from upper division science and math courses) are taken in the testing center on computers. Some classes require you to take the test at home on your computer through a program, but while taking the test we are being recorded through webcam and microphone, as well as not being capable of having any other window tabs or programs open. I really dislike it honestly. Im more of a pencil and paper kind of guy.
     
  18. Sep 20, 2017 #17

    symbolipoint

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    What is missing when systems are applied this way or this purpose is LEADERSHIP.
     
  19. Sep 20, 2017 #18

    DS2C

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    Agreed. And for me personally, being in an actual classroom with an instructor and student peers is a highly conducive learning environment. The human aspect of it is an extremely important portion. Sitting in front of a computer screen at home is just bad form.
     
  20. Oct 3, 2017 #19
    Since this is a relatively new way of learning, we should weigh its pros and cons and look at it very objectively.

    Pros:

    • It's driven by their passion.
    • You can choose from a wide variety of topics.
    • It costs less than a real-world class.
    • There's more flexibility -- a class can be short-term or long-term.
    • Online learning can be a boon for shy kids.
    • It also can be ideal for remotely located kids.
    • If the class is recorded, you can rewind, fast-forward, and pause.
    Cons:
    • The quality varies.
    • The lack of human interaction could contribute to a feeling of isolation.
    • The format could lead to procrastinating or quitting early.
    • You must be a self-directed learner.
    • You may not be able to see everything demonstrated clearly -- and he or she can't move up to the front of the class.
    • There's potential for inappropriate content.
    There are online players like Coursera, CanopyLAB, Neostencil, DataCamp whose courses have been tremendously successful and helping students grow. This is something that is going to dominate the education space in the coming future and that is the reason why big players like Facebook is also investing in Online education
     
  21. Oct 3, 2017 #20
    True, but most of these cons are also shared by live lectures especially the large service course lectures.

    The video below reviews the history and impact of technology ( radio, TV, computers) on education. Technology while useful is not the total answer to a good educational system.

     
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