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Featured Stargazing U.S. Solar Eclipse of Aug. 21, 2017

  1. Jun 10, 2017 #121
    The good news for me is that I´ll be out on vacations from college on this date, the bad news, I don´t think I can afford a trip to the US, being a broken college student in Mexico City does not allow much of my budget for traveling (shame, shame). Still here will be visible as a partial eclipse, so I got that going for me, which is fine.
     
  2. Jun 10, 2017 #122

    OmCheeto

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    There will be one in your area in about 7 years. Start saving your money, and bookmark this thread.

    I'm 58 years old, and this will be the first one I've had an opportunity to see.
    I just checked my military records, and discovered I was in Florida the last time an eclipse was in the area.
    It's kind of funny, as just two months later I was transferred to Idaho, very near the path.
    But not too funny. :oldgrumpy:
     
  3. Jun 11, 2017 #123
    Assuming the moon is moving outwards (away from earth) at a [current] rate of about 4cm a year (1m in 25ys; 100,000km in 2.5 bill. ys), can someone give a rough estimate of when will be the last total eclipse?
     
  4. Jun 11, 2017 #124

    mfb

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  5. Jun 11, 2017 #125

    Janus

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    I get roughly 787 million years. This is assuming the last possible total eclipse will occur when the Earth is at aphelion while the Moon is at perigee. This does not however take into account any change in the Earth/Sun distance during that time period.
     
  6. Jun 11, 2017 #126
    Sounds reasonable, and thanks for the source (I saw the earth-solar system etc. timeline table ... - other useful deadlines/timelines on your source too).
    But I mostly meant with a rough calculation, assuming noticable changes on the moon phenomenal diameter, assuming at first stage that the earth is not moving away from the Sun ... (but it does! ...).
    Sounds reasonable too, and it's about of the same order of magnitude as mfb's.
    I agree.
     
  7. Jun 11, 2017 #127

    Janus

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    It also doesn't take into account other factors, such as continental drift, which by changing the arrangement of the continents, alters the value of the tidal drag and thus the recession rate of the Moon.
     
  8. Jun 11, 2017 #128

    anorlunda

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    Wow, I think that's pretty amazing that the models are so refined as to make effects that small significant. How big is that effect. ##10^{-1}##? ##10^{-3}##? ##10^{-5}##?
     
  9. Jun 11, 2017 #129

    mfb

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    It should be quite significant, as water tides are an important part of the process. Unfortunately it is hard to model that.

    The size of Sun increases over time, this is relevant as well.
     
  10. Jun 11, 2017 #130
    Furthermore, both moon's recession rate as well as earth's rotation seem to be slowing down over time (with a connection between the two effects).
    E.g. see:
    http://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Recession_of_the_Moon

    Note: precise current moon retreat rate: (3.82±0.07) cm/yr
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2017
  11. Jun 13, 2017 #131
    Let's enjoy the total solar eclipses for the next ~600 million years, starting with the one coming up ...
    Yeah, we got time! :smile:
     
  12. Jun 13, 2017 #132
    I travelled to Penzance in the UK for the August 11 1999 eclipse and it rained!

    I had better luck for the March 29 2006 one in Side,Turkey. We were right on the eclipse track and the BBC team were in the next hotel. Unfortunately dear old Patrick Moore was too ill to attend. I got some great video and stills of the event. I still had time to see it in all its glory despite fiddling with cameras!

    Truly awesome is the only way to describe a total solar eclipse.
     
  13. Jun 17, 2017 #133
    This one will pass right over me. I'll be out there watching, probably in Gallatin Tennessee, or wherever in the state the best weather is.
     
  14. Jun 19, 2017 #134

    Borg

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  15. Jun 21, 2017 #135

    Borg

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    NASA's Great American Total Solar Eclipse Preview @ 1 pm ET Today
     
  16. Jun 21, 2017 #136
    1. Science Briefing about the eclipse by NASA (a bit lengthy, but good video):


    2. Interesting and short ... :
     
  17. Jun 23, 2017 #137
    New & interesting (excellent videos from NASA):
    1. Eclipse Primer on "This Week @NASA" (Today, Fri June 23, 2017):

    2. Ways to watch the Eclipse (came out on 6/21/17):

    3. Safety Briefing (6/21/17):
     
  18. Jun 23, 2017 #138
    This makes me glad to be living in Salem, I just hope the weather doesn't do anything crazy. :)
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2017
  19. Jun 27, 2017 #139

    Borg

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    Last edited: Jun 27, 2017
  20. Jun 27, 2017 #140
    I still have my packet of "Science&Telescope" eclipse glasses from the Aug. 11, 1999 eclipse in Europe. Who thinks they are still safe to use them?

    Here's also a couple of short videos from back then:

     
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