Use of transistors to turn on an LED

In summary: The current the comparator can output is not mentioned in the question. Also, it is not clear what you are asking.
  • #1
akaliuseheal
53
8

Homework Statement


Hello,
I have got input from comparator op amp which gives HIGH or LOW. Based upon that, one of two LEDs needs to light up. Two LEDs should't be ON at the same time.
Calculations are not needed, only the schematics.

Homework Equations


None

The Attempt at a Solution


I am not really familiar with the transistors, so I used logic gates.

Untitled.png

Input = 1
AND 1 | NOR 0

Input = 0
AND 0 | NOR 1The use of logic gates should be avoided here, thus the use of transistors comes to my mind.
 

Attachments

  • Untitled.png
    Untitled.png
    2 KB · Views: 538
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Hint -- Use Google Images and search for Emitter-Follower Transistor LED Drive and Common-Emitter Transistor LED Drive (two separate searches). Show us what you find, and tell us which one of those is an inverting configuration and which is a buffer configuration (for NPN transistors). :smile:
 
  • #3
berkeman said:
Hint -- Use Google Images and search for Emitter-Follower Transistor LED Drive and Common-Emitter Transistor LED Drive (two separate searches). Show us what you find, and tell us which one of those is an inverting configuration and which is a buffer configuration (for NPN transistors). :smile:

Thanks for looking at the thread, I will be looking into that a bit later, Busy right now.

Original text may be a bit vague. So, to avoid confusion, one LED is always ON. If input is logic 1 , first LED is ON. If input is logic 0, second LED is ON.
 
  • #4
akaliuseheal said:
I have got input from comparator op amp which gives HIGH or LOW. Based upon that, one of two LEDs needs to light up. Two LEDs should't be ON at the same time.
Calculations are not needed, only the schematics.
You have a comparator whose o/p can be taken to be logic HI or logic LO. Can it be somewhere in between HI and LO? You want this to drive a pair of LEDs, with one LED glowing to indicate the comparator o/p is HI and the other LED similarly indicating but on o/p LO. Is there a requirement for buffering, or is it okay to use a comparator that is able to drive the LEDs directly?
 
  • #5
NascentOxygen said:
You have a comparator whose o/p can be taken to be logic HI or logic LO. Can it be somewhere in between HI and LO?
I am using comparator with hysteresis, I don't think it can be somewhere in between.
You want this to drive a pair of LEDs, with one LED glowing to indicate the comparator o/p is HI and the other LED similarly indicating but on o/p LO.
Yes
Is there a requirement for buffering, or is it okay for the comparator to drive the LEDs directly?
I think it would be okay.

I only had one electronics course so far and it was introductory. In this course we do some introductory circuit designing with a lot of variables ignored like system response or accuracy of measurements. This is the last part of the circuit.
 
  • #6
Do you know the voltage levels of the comparator's output? What supply voltage/s do you have available?
 
  • #7
NascentOxygen said:
Do you know the voltage levels of the comparator's output? What supply voltage/s do you have available?

Well, calculating the values of all the components used is the part two of the project, first I need to complete the schematics. I won't actually build this. Project is only done on the paper. Meaning, I can use any part that can be bought from some store or ordered online, every part in existence is available.
 
  • #8
Have you been given enough hints to be able to finish this now? Just make sure to specify the gate driving the LEDs is of a type that has buffering.
 
  • #9
NascentOxygen said:
Have you been given enough hints to be able to finish this now?
To be honest, by myself no. No reason for me to lie. Like I said, I know really basic stuff in electronics. But browsing the internet, I stumbled upon some thread stating that using a transistor is not needed and "overkill". Use of transistor here is not obligatory.

And this was provided
Capture.PNG
 

Attachments

  • Capture.PNG
    Capture.PNG
    26.3 KB · Views: 399
  • #10
Does that look like it will do what you want?
 
  • #11
NascentOxygen said:
Does that look like it will do what you want?
On the first glance it looked weird, but explanation is provided and there is a video in which it is seen working. I would have to show it to my professor so he could tell me if that solution is acceptable.
 
  • Like
Likes NascentOxygen
  • #12
How much current can your comparator output source and sink?
 
  • Like
Likes Tom.G and berkeman

What is a transistor?

A transistor is a type of electronic component that can act as a switch or amplifier for an electrical signal. It is made up of three layers of semiconductor material, which allow it to control the flow of electricity.

How does a transistor turn on an LED?

When a small amount of current is applied to the base of a transistor, it allows a larger current to flow from the collector to the emitter. This current can then power an LED, turning it on.

Why are transistors used to control LEDs?

Transistors are used to control LEDs because they act as an efficient on/off switch. They can handle high currents and voltage levels, making them ideal for controlling the flow of electricity to an LED.

What are the benefits of using transistors to turn on LEDs?

Using transistors to turn on LEDs allows for precise control over the amount of current and voltage that is supplied to the LED. This helps to prevent damage to the LED and ensures that it operates at its optimal level.

Are there any limitations to using transistors to turn on LEDs?

One limitation of using transistors to turn on LEDs is that they can only handle a certain amount of current and voltage. If the current or voltage exceeds the transistor's capabilities, it can cause it to overheat and fail. Additionally, transistors can be sensitive to static electricity and may require additional protective measures when handling them.

Similar threads

  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
19
Views
2K
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
2K
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
34
Views
2K
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
14
Views
1K
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
10
Views
1K
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
9
Views
2K
Back
Top