1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Using what I've learned in the classroom for Graphical Data

  1. Sep 12, 2016 #1
    I'm a first-year undergraduate student in mathematics and physics. In my Chemistry Lab class we've recently completed a graphical representation of data assignment and it was interesting. My question is, what can I do in regards to mathematics and physics, or something interesting in general, with the knowledge that I've acquired in the classroom, so I can get a feel for what it's like to actually use this in a "real-world" situation? I was thinking maybe something about computational physics, chemistry, mathematics, etc.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 12, 2016 #2

    Simon Bridge

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    Depends on what you learned.
     
  4. Sep 12, 2016 #3
    We learned how to graph data using Microsoft Excel, or similar software, and I've already learned how to use matlab for calculations and the like. I also learned to not always use linear functions, sometimes a logarithmic or exponential function; depending on what the data provides. In short, I learned how to represent data graphically.
     
  5. Sep 12, 2016 #4

    Simon Bridge

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    Find something you are interested in, collect data, and represent that resulting data graphically.
    What are you interested in?

    Pretty much everything can involve collecting data that can be represented graphically.
    Almost all real life situations involve graphing, graphics, or using graphical representations.
     
  6. Sep 12, 2016 #5
    You are looking for specific examples, right?
     
  7. Sep 12, 2016 #6
    Yes. Something that could provide me with: More knowledge about physics or math & an opportunity to use my knowledge outside of the classroom.
     
  8. Sep 13, 2016 #7
    Here is just one example. If you measure the equilibrium vapor pressure of a substance as a function of temperature, a plot of the natural log of the vapor pressure as a function of the reciprocal of the absolute temperature T should be a straight line. The slope of this line can be used to determine the heat of vaporization.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted