Virus - how to destroy

  • Thread starter Edgardo
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  • #26
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Ian, it's ok i'm a nerd too!:biggrin: Comforting to know there are people out there like me! :tongue2:

So what happens to styroform when you autoclave it? Does it just shrink and become hard?

Back to orginal topic: what other chemicals act as viruscides?
 
  • #27
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Thanks for you answer.
But I'd like to know
1) how does a virus-container look like?
2) how do I treat that container? Do I just open it and spray some of that anti-virus stuff? I'd appreciate it if you could describe in detail how to treat the container.
 
  • #28
iansmith
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misskitty said:
So what happens to styroform when you autoclave it? Does it just shrink and become hard?

It swhrik to a quart of size and become really hard. Maybe not as hard as a rock but enough to hurt people. That it is it but it is pretty cool.

Edgardo said:
1) how does a virus-container look like?
2) how do I treat that container? Do I just open it and spray some of that anti-virus stuff? I'd appreciate it if you could describe in detail how to treat the container.

It is just a plastic container at best (it might be a plastic bag) that says the materials is biohazard. There is nothing special.
 
  • #29
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How does the bag not melt when you put it in the autoclave if it is just plastic?
 
  • #30
iansmith
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It is type of plastic that is resistant to autoclaving.
 
  • #31
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That would make sense. Do you know the maximum temperature that plastic can withstand before melting?

What other kinds of viruscides are there?
 
  • #32
iansmith
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misskitty said:
That would make sense. Do you know the maximum temperature that plastic can withstand before melting?

for autoclaving, the instruction says not to excede 125C. The bag will sometimes melt if it is strech.

Nalgene as some technical data

Specific Plastic Considerations

Polypropylene, polymethylpentene, polypropylene copolymer, TEFZEL ETFE, TEFLON FEP, and PFA may be autoclaved repeatedly at 121°C, 15 psig. Cycles should be at least 15 minutes to ensure sterility.

Polycarbonate products are autoclavable. They must be thoroughly rinsed before autoclaving because detergent residues cause crazing and spotting. Autoclaving cycles should be limited to 20 minutes at 121°C. PC shows some loss of mechanical strength after repeated autoclaving and therefore may not function well under high-stress applications, such as centrifugation. Our PC vacuum chambers are considered "not autoclavable" for this reason.

Do not use strong alkaline detergents on polycarbonate. Do not use boiler steam containing alkaline chemical additives that may attack the plastic and cause the item to fail.

Acetal products are autoclavable at recommended settings. Proper ventilation is required as acetal will emit formaldehyde odor during autoclaving. The following statement complies with the California Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986: "WARNING: Upon autoclaving, this product may release formaldehyde, a chemical known to the State of California as a carcinogen."

Polysulfone products are autoclavable. They are somewhat weakened by repeated autoclaving, although less than polycarbonate. If autoclaved repeatedly, polysulfone products will eventually fail under high-stress applications, such as high-speed centrifugation.

NALGENE PVC Tubing can be autoclaved, but ethylene oxide or chemical disinfectant is preferred. If you autoclave it, follow these guidelines:

Clean and rinse tubing thoroughly, including final rinse with distilled or deionized water. Coil tubing loosely and keep ends open. Wrap in muslin or linen; tape or tie loosely. Place on a nonmetallic tray in the autoclave so wrapped tubing is not touching wall or rack of autoclave. Do not stack anything on the tubing. Use 15 minute cycle at 121°C, 15 psig. Restore clarity of tubing by drying approximately 2 hours at a temperature no higher than 75°C.

NALGENE Silicone Tubing can be autoclaved for 30 minutes at 121C, 15 psig in muslin cloth or sterilizing paper.

Labware made of the following plastics is not autoclavable under any conditions: polystyrene, polyvinyl chloride (except PVC tubing), styrene acrylonitrile, acrylic, low-density and high-density polyethylene and polyurethane.

http://www.nalgenepackaging.com/techdata/care/steril-autoclaving.asp

misskitty said:
What other kinds of viruscides are there?

The one I list are the commonly one that I knew on top of my head. Some virus are sensitive to UV light and for example will not survive in the sun outside any biological fluid.
 

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