Visciosity of air and water

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This decreases the viscosity.In summary, the viscosity of air increases with temperature due to increased molecular interaction, while the viscosity of water decreases with temperature due to molecular attractions being overcome by higher energy molecules.
  • #1
stan
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hi all,

does anyone knows why the visciosity of air increases with temp while that of water decreases with temp?

dont the higher temp causes the molecules to vibrate faster, thus allowinh more space to collide with each other, the visciosity should decreases..


thanks for any advice..

stan
 
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  • #2
The viscosity of a gas increases with temperature because of molecular interaction. In gases, molecular collisions transfer momentum between fluid layers. As temperature increases, the molecules move faster and more momentum is transferred between layers (layers of maolecules with a certain velocity), thereby increasing the viscosity.

In a liquid, the viscous effects are from molecular attractions between fluid layers. The higher the temps, the more energy the molecules have to overcome the attractions.
 
  • #3


Hi Stan,

The reason for the difference in viscosity between air and water at different temperatures is due to their molecular structure. Air is made up of smaller, lighter molecules such as nitrogen and oxygen, which are able to move and collide with each other more easily at higher temperatures. This leads to a decrease in viscosity as the molecules are able to move more freely and flow more easily.

On the other hand, water molecules are larger and more tightly packed, making it more difficult for them to move and flow. At higher temperatures, the molecules have more energy and are able to break away from each other, reducing the overall viscosity of water.

In summary, the molecular structure of air and water play a significant role in their viscosity at different temperatures. I hope this helps answer your question!
 

Related to Visciosity of air and water

What is the difference between the viscocity of air and water?

The viscocity of a substance is a measure of its resistance to flow. In air, molecules are more spread out and move more freely, resulting in a lower viscocity compared to water, where molecules are more densely packed and have stronger intermolecular forces, resulting in a higher viscocity.

How is the viscocity of air and water measured?

The viscocity of a substance is typically measured using a viscometer, which is a device that measures the time it takes for a fluid to flow through a small tube. The longer the time, the higher the viscocity.

What factors can affect the viscocity of air and water?

The viscocity of a substance can be affected by temperature, pressure, and the presence of impurities. In general, higher temperatures and lower pressures lead to a lower viscocity, while the presence of impurities can increase the viscocity.

Why is the viscocity of air and water important in everyday life?

The viscocity of air and water can have a significant impact on various processes and phenomena in everyday life. For example, the viscocity of air determines how quickly a parachute falls or how much drag a car experiences while driving. The viscocity of water affects the speed and flow of rivers, as well as the efficiency of boats and ships.

Can the viscocity of air and water change under different conditions?

Yes, the viscocity of air and water can vary depending on the specific conditions. For example, the viscocity of water can increase with higher pressure or colder temperatures, while the viscocity of air can decrease at higher altitudes due to lower air pressure. Additionally, different substances can be added to air and water to alter their viscocity.

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