Voltage across resistors in series and parallel

  • Thread starter TrolliOlli
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  • #1
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So I must be missing some crucial knowledge in my knowledge of electrostatics because I simply don't understand how this works. I'm given a circuit like this:

[PLAIN]http://img3.imageshack.us/img3/8730/circuiti.png [Broken]

and I find out the voltage across bulb B is the same as that across the 10 ohm resistor.

I was under the impression that, since we know V = IR and we know the current across B is the same as the current across the 10 ohm resistor the Voltage would be different assuming B has a resistance other than 10 ohms. What am I missing here?
 
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Answers and Replies

  • #2
Doc Al
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The voltage is the same, not necessarily the current. Branches in parallel have the same voltage.
 
  • #3
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The voltage is the same, not necessarily the current. Branches in parallel have the same voltage.
Would that also apply to two resistors in series? If I simply had a battery with two resistors in series would their voltage be equal regardless of whether or not their resistors were equal?
 
  • #4
Doc Al
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Would that also apply to two resistors in series? If I simply had a battery with two resistors in series would their voltage be equal regardless of whether or not their resistors were equal?
Things in parallel have the same voltage; things in series have the same current.
 

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