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Waveguide standing wave pattern

  1. Nov 20, 2012 #1
    Hi everybody, that's my question, I have been measuring the standing wave pattern within a waveguide (X band) using a slotted line, I put a short circuit termination and the theory said that we expect a rectified sine, but I don't get that, my result is in the picture

    thump_8136214swrpat.jpg

    I can't explain my results and I have tried with two different microwave sources (10.5 GHz).

    I appreciate your help.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 21, 2012 #2

    sophiecentaur

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    That looks more like the phase variation along a line than the amplitude variation. Is that possible?
     
  4. Nov 21, 2012 #3

    sophiecentaur

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    How does that pattern change when you change the load on the end (good match / fair match / short circuit) ?
     
  5. Nov 21, 2012 #4
    I have measured the standing wave pattern in the air using the same source and the results looks better, of course that's not a short circuit but the wave is not inclined.

    thump_8136530swrair.jpg

    I've been thinking if it is about the propagation mode.
     
  6. Nov 21, 2012 #5
    The picture is a short circuit, and when the load is changed, the swr and the phase changes, but the wave is still inclined.

    thump_8136540swrarb.jpg

    That's an arbitrary load pattern.
     
  7. Nov 21, 2012 #6

    sophiecentaur

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    You need someone with more experience with waveguide, I think. My actual work was all on UHF and coax feeder.
    If I were chasing stange things like that, I think I'd put a 3dB attenuator (resistive) in the source to improve that match and put a good terminating load at the end. If I couldn't get a flattish line then, I would be scratching my head. I could suggest that harmonics in the signal source could be setting up another standing wave which adds to the one you want? (Not relevant if you are using a 'proper' receiver but could be, if you are just using a simple detector.) Solution: filter the output of the signal source.
     
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