What are the names of these 2 craters on Mars...

  • #1

Summary:

names of 2 craters on Mars: 58N 58E , 70N 352E
I am looking for the names of 2 craters on Mars. They are of interest to me because they are very deep & may have enough air pressure to support liquid water. If you have an internet link for looking up names that will do, but the links I websearched dont show the 2 craters below. The craters are:

1. What is the name of the small deep crater, approximately 30km across, near latitude 58 degrees north & longitude 58 degrees east ?
(...roughly 30 degrees west of Lyot & 8 degrees north of Lyot.)

2. What is the name of the small deep crater, approximately 50km across, near latitude 70 degrees north & longitude 352 degrees east ?
(...roughly 5 degrees due north of Lomonosov. )
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
jim mcnamara
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IS this how you found the craters?
https://pubs.usgs.gov/imap/i2782/

If not maybe you could use these maps and interpolate to get decent coordinates. You did interpolate your current guesses, right?

The USGS has several kinds of planetary maps, so I assume others are available for Mars that might help.

Sorry this is what I know - not much. @Janus may know more
 
  • #3
russ_watters
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They are of interest to me because they are very deep & may have enough air pressure to support liquid water.
Where did you get the idea that that is possible? It doesn't seem possible to me.
 
  • #4
Vanadium 50
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I think the rationale is that if you take the highest the temperature ever gets on Mars, and the highest the air pressure ever gets (presumably by going to the bottom of a crater), you can get to the liquid region of the phase diagram.

However, this is not enough. You also need to have these conditions occur together, which is unlikely with carters this far north, and you need the partial pressure of H2O in the atmosphere to exceed the vapor pressure. All at then same place and time.
 
  • #5
Of course.
My conjecture is that when humans live on Mars, the higher the air pressure the less need for pressure suits.

Hellas actually supports liquid water in the deepest zones, with boiling point around 7degrees celcius. But Hellas has a terrible climate, most of the martian year is CO2 freezing temperatures, and only going above 7 celcius (literally "boiling hot") for a few weeks at perhelion.

The northern craters (or maybe equatorial Mariner Valley) have much less drastic climates where winter is at perhelion & summer is at aphelion, so probably for enjoyable for human habitation.
Craters deep enough to support liquid water would be prime places for humans to live, perhaps Lyot & Lomosov fall into that group.

Korolev has permanent ice in it, being rather northerly, but for humans, pressurized tunned could easliy be melted int the ice, making for simple large habitation. Korolev is at the center of the large northen plains, so will be an important transport hub.
 
  • #6
The two craters I requested names for are large & deep, yet I have not found names for them on any map resources.
 
  • #7
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This Wikipedia page purports to list all of the craters with official names. I have reviewed the lists and, unless I made an error, none of the coordinates match your craters'. So, it seems likely that they are unnamed. (Wikipedia notes that "in general, only craters that have a significant research interest are given names".
 
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Likes davenn
  • #8
Thanks guys, I guess they have no names yet. But I reckon they are among the most significant halfdozen craters of the northern plains.
 
  • #9
Jim McNamara, I got the coordinate off a Mars map that told you the coordinates when you hovered over a location. But I dont expect the accuracy was very fine.
As for discovering these two, I downloaded an altitude map into Worldpainter which creates Minecraft maps. I thought I might see some new information looking at it in 3D. And I discovered these two very deep craters I hadnt noticed before. A bit of a story, in case anyone interested. I better crosscheck my findings against an interactive 3D map I know of on the web.
 
  • #10
davenn
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I got the coordinate off a Mars map that told you the coordinates when you hovered over a location. But I dont expect the accuracy was very fine.

How about doing a screenshot of the map so we can see the craters you are referring to
otherwise this is all so very hearsay

Dave
 
  • #11
I have attached maps & circled in red the craters of interest.
The deepest craters in northern hemisphere (from east to west) are:
Lyot; 58n,58e* ; Mie; Korolev; Milankovic; Kunowsky; Lomonosov; 70n,352e* (craters of interest are asterisked).
I am deriving crater depths from:
https://astrogeology.usgs.gov/searc...LA_Blend/Mars_HRSC_MOLA_BlendDEM_Global_200mp
It is a NASA black-to-white Mars height map that is only 60Kb, so it may not be authoritative.
Even so, these two craters of interest are far deeper than others, nearly as deep as the six named craters listed above.
 

Attachments

  • #14
Just to clarify, by "deepest craters" I am referring to the crater bottom being at the lowest martian elevation.
I am interested in where air pressure would be highest.
I am NOT referring to bottom-to-rim difference.
 
  • #15
It is hard to grasp how deep these craters are by looking at maps. But when I converted the elevation map to a 3D model via the Worldpainter software mentioned above, these two craters of interest ( 58n,58e ; 70n,352e ) REALLY stood out as being of interest.
 
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