What hand tools do physicists commonly use in the laboratory?

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I came across an article about a particle physicist who made a custom case for his calipers, radius gauges, and screw pitch gauges. The project, available here, turned out nice. The article had me wondering, do physicists rely on calipers that much in the laboratory? I'm curious, what other hand tools do physicists commonly use?
 
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The tools we use become an extension of our brain.
The loss of a reliable tool can be debilitating.

Only special master tools, that are critical, but seldom used, require special storage.

I would not classify battery powered digital calipers as worthy of custom packaging, unless it made special provision for the storage of replacement long life batteries.
 
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Baluncore said:
The tools we use become an extension of our brain.
The loss of a reliable tool can be debilitating.

Only special master tools, that are critical, but seldom used, require special storage.

I would not classify battery powered digital calipers as worthy of custom packaging, unless it made special provision for the storage of replacement long life batteries.
It's not uncommon in workshops to keep calipers in a mahogany case to prevent the tool from being damaged or losing calibration. But my question was more broad. I meant to ask what common hand tools that are usually seen in workshops are used by physicists, if any?
 
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The chalk is mightier than the sword.
 
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Mgt3 said:
I came across an article about a particle physicist who made a custom case for his calipers, radius gauges, and screw pitch gauges. The project, available here, turned out nice. The article had me wondering, do physicists rely on calipers that much in the laboratory? I'm curious, what other hand tools do physicists commonly use?
Hand tools? None. That is a bygone era. Maybe a computer is the closest. Definitely not LHC, LIGO, or JWST.
I think you maybe confusing engineers and physicists.

Wait... no... pencils. Definitely pencils.
 
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Haborix said:
The chalk is mightier than the sword.
Hagoromo Fulltouch is the best!
DaveE said:
pencil
Faber Mongol 482 #2

And before you mention pens, Uni-Ball Roller Medium.

Markers? Staetdleer Lumocolor.
 
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The tools depend on the physics.
A scientific officer, or a technician, would use hand tools in an experimental environment.
 
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Mgt3 said:
I'm curious, what other hand tools do physicists commonly use?
What other tools? Well clearly: laser safety goggles, catcher's masks, face shields, chest protectors, etc...

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  • #9
Mgt3 said:
It's not uncommon in workshops to keep calipers in a mahogany case to prevent the tool from being damaged or losing calibration. But my question was more broad. I meant to ask what common hand tools that are usually seen in workshops are used by physicists, if any?
It obviously depends on what type of work you are doing, but most labs would have the the usual assortment of screwdrivers, spanners, pliers etc.
 

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