What is the role of NOS and DO/S in network operating systems?

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In summary, a network operating system is a separate entity that provides data to the local operating system. It can be synchronized with the local operating system, but it is not part of it.
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rtareen
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Trying to understand the concept of a DO/S and how it is implemented.
I'm attaching a picture for reference. The full reference is Chapter 10 of "Understanding Operating Systems" by McHoes and Flynn., seventh edition.

I'm understanding a network operating system (NOS) to be a separate entity from the local operating system that gets the data and gives it to the local operating system to process locally on your own computer. The local operating system cannot tell the difference between local data and data obtained by the NOS. It's like a little fetch function that returns data from another node by doing the dirty work and going through the network and all its protocols. The local operating system doesn't care how the NOS got it, but just sees the data it returns. At least that's how I understood it.

But I don't understand DO/S at all. They're making it appear to be this ethereal operating system that controls all the computers in the network. I can't understand this in terms of networks such as the internet. Do all computers on the internet share an omnipresent operating system that exists throughout space in the ether? I think not and I don't know how to properly comprehend it.

Wikipedia said that a DO/S is "system software over a collection of independent software, networked, communicating, and physically separate computational nodes". They way I understand this is that it is part of the local operating system and all computers have it, and that its synchronized. But how can all computers have the exact software needed to synchronize everything when there are several manufacturers who design their operating systems differently. I don't have all the information I need for this to make sense.
 

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What may be confusing here is that DOS can mean either DISK Operating System (like PC DOS) or Distributed Operating System. They are different concepts.

A Raspberry PI with an SD card with a full image of LINUX on it is a simple standalone computer. It doesn't need a network to boot or to run.

This may help:

https://ipwithease.com/nos-vs-dos/

Basically in a NOS the computers on the network have local files and folders and have shared access to files and folders on other computers. Software development teams use networked computers to share source code e.g. GIT or SVN and software tools.

In contrast, a DOS treats the computers on the network as extensions of itself, and each computer must request access to shared resources like printers, files, and folders. When you run programs from a distributed computer, it will utilize other computers on the network to help it get the job done.

https://lemp.io/what-are-the-examples-of-distributed-operating-system/

A distributed operating system is a computer system that uses multiple computers to provide resources and services to users. This type of system is often used in large organizations where many users need access to shared resources, such as files, printers, and email servers.

There are several benefits to using a distributed operating system.

First, it can provide a higher level of availability than a single-computer system. If one computer in the system goes down, the others can still provide services to users.

Second, it can offer better performance than a single-computer system. When multiple computers are used, each can be dedicated to a specific task, such as handling email requests or serving web pages. This can lead to faster response times for users.
 
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Thank you for your answer and the resources.
 

Related to What is the role of NOS and DO/S in network operating systems?

What is NOS?

NOS stands for "Nature of Science". It refers to the underlying principles and characteristics that guide scientific inquiry and the development of scientific knowledge.

What is DO/S?

DO/S stands for "Dimensions of Scientific Practices". It is a framework that outlines the key aspects of scientific practices, such as constructing explanations, planning and carrying out investigations, and analyzing and interpreting data.

Why is it important to understand NOS and DO/S?

Understanding NOS and DO/S helps scientists to have a deeper understanding of the scientific process and how scientific knowledge is developed. It also helps to promote critical thinking skills and scientific literacy among the general public.

What are some key components of NOS?

Some key components of NOS include the idea that science is based on evidence and observation, that scientific knowledge is tentative and subject to change, and that scientific explanations are based on natural causes rather than supernatural ones.

How are DO/S and NOS related?

DO/S and NOS are closely related as they both aim to provide a framework for understanding the nature and practice of science. DO/S focuses more on the specific dimensions of scientific practices, while NOS provides a broader perspective on the underlying principles and characteristics of science.

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