What is the Schrodinger Equation?

In summary, Schrodinger's equation is a fundamental equation in quantum mechanics that describes the wave-mechanical nature of particles such as electrons and atoms. It is similar to "F=ma" in classical mechanics and involves the concept of time transformation through the Hamiltonian. It is a partial differential equation that describes the wavefunction of a quantum particle. It is typically studied in second year undergraduate physics or chemistry courses.
  • #1
Dynamite
28
0
So I've been looking online @ Schrodinger's Equation, but I still can't get a good grasp of what it's all about...
All I know so far is that its part of quantum mechanics and that its solutions describe atomic and subatomic systems, electrons and atoms.. <---but what does that actually mean?

And I read that there were 2 variants...
(And the simple English definition on Wikipedia is insufficient)

So.. what is the equation all about?
 
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  • #2
Think Newtonian kinematics, then dynamics; then have another look.
 
  • #3
.. I'm still as confused as I started out to begin with...
 
  • #4
Well, the wave-mechanical nature of classical objects, is used to formulate a wave-machanical description of "an electron's position and momentum' = kinematic and dynamic properties.

Start with linear motion (kinematics and dynamics), go through harmonic motion, end up with Schrodinger. It's about one undergrad Physics book worth (unless you're a quick study).
You aren't usually introduced to the quantum and Schrodinger, until 2nd year, btw.
At least in Chem or Phys you aren't (it's for the bigger kids)...
 
  • #5
HAHA. O goodness. That's great. Because here I am sitting in high school trying to make some sense out of this. Thanks for your help!
 
  • #6
um...


Simply speaking, Schrodinger's equation is corresponding to "F=ma" at Newton mechanics.
In other word, more difficultly say, it also corresponds to time generation equation at hamilton mechanics. Hamiltonian in Schrodinger's equation undertakes as time transform generator.
 
  • #7
it is a partially differential equation in which the unknown variable is the wavefunction
 

Related to What is the Schrodinger Equation?

1. What is the Schrodinger Equation?

The Schrodinger Equation is a fundamental equation in quantum mechanics that describes the time evolution of a quantum state. It was developed by Austrian physicist Erwin Schrodinger in 1926.

2. How does the Schrodinger Equation work?

The Schrodinger Equation describes how the quantum state of a physical system changes over time. It uses mathematical terms to represent the energy, position, and other properties of a quantum state, and predicts how these properties will change over time.

3. What is the significance of the Schrodinger Equation?

The Schrodinger Equation is significant because it provided a way to describe the behavior of particles at the atomic and subatomic level, which could not be explained by classical mechanics. It is a cornerstone of quantum mechanics and has been used to make accurate predictions about the behavior of quantum systems.

4. How is the Schrodinger Equation different from other equations in physics?

The Schrodinger Equation is different from other equations in physics because it is a wave equation, meaning it describes the behavior of a wave-like function. It is also a complex equation, meaning it uses imaginary numbers to represent physical quantities. This allows it to describe the probabilistic nature of quantum systems.

5. What are the applications of the Schrodinger Equation?

The Schrodinger Equation has many applications in quantum mechanics, including predicting the behavior and properties of atoms, molecules, and other quantum systems. It is also used in fields such as quantum computing and quantum chemistry to understand and manipulate quantum systems for various technological advancements.

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