What is the structural level of fibrous proteins: secondary or tertiary?

In summary: Yeah, that sums it up pretty well !Oh my...! . Well, that's a bummer... . :oldfrown:I had a rather rough day today so thanks for bringing out some hapiness !More like at least you’re not wrong.More like at least you’re not wrong.
  • #1
Navin
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My question is if fibrous proteins posess secandory or if they posess tertiary structure

There is a fiery debate between me and one smart dude from my class.I believe(firmly) that proteins posess secandory structure while he is of that school of thought that believes fibrous proteins have a Tertiary structure

We both have source material claiming our point.Internet sites and tedtbook give conflicting
Results ! Some say tertiary while others say only secandory...funny eh ?

And we also asked our awesome bio professor who criptically said " you are right Navin and you are also right (pointing to my oponent) and the answer shall come in gods good time".

...so...my question still stands...what is the steuctural level of fibrous proteins.

I can provide links and pictures from a very reliable set of reliable textbooks if you ask saying it has secandory structure.
 
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  • #2
Navin said:
I can provide links and pictures from a very reliable set of reliable textbooks if you ask saying it has secandory structure.

On second thought i would like to withdraw this statement as PF policy might not accept this as a "reliable" source

I tried Searching on the internet but apart from a few sites(which i won't consider reliable) most of the web doesn't speak about it.

So let me edit what i want to ask

" What is the sructural level of Fibrous Proteins and compare it with Globular."

I have searched the net but there is no concrete answer and i would like it if anyone could inform me as to what is the structure of fibrous proteins.
 
  • #3
I think the problem here is that Mother Nature is an engineer and there are examples of both kinds and others that can be cited.

I found this reference:

https://revisionworld.com/gcse-revi...and-amino-acids/globular-and-fibrous-proteins

Which shows that collagen has several structural layers of primary, secondary, tertiary and finally quartenary. Each provides added engineering to collagen to strengthen it.
 
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  • #4
jedishrfu said:
I think the problem here is that Mother Nature is an engineer and there are examples of both kinds and others that can be cited.

I found this reference:

https://revisionworld.com/gcse-revi...and-amino-acids/globular-and-fibrous-proteins

Which shows that collagen has several structural layers of primary, secondary, tertiary and finally quartenary. Each provides added engineering to collagen to strengthen it.
Thats true...
Because then we have something like α-Keretin which is said to have repeating Secandary structure*...huh

Well anyway mother nature and her fancies !Atleast to some extent i am right !

Than you so much jedishrfu. !*https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alpha-keratin
 
  • #5
Navin said:
Thats true...
Because then we have something like α-Keretin which is said to have repeating Secandary structure*...huh

Well anyway mother nature and her fancies !Atleast to some extent i am right !

Than you so much jedishrfu. !*https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alpha-keratin

More like at least you’re not wrong.
 
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  • #6
jedishrfu said:
More like at least you’re not wrong.
I don't know why but this post made me laugh maniacally for 7 minutes ! You earn a +1 Navin Point for this.I had a rather rough day today so thanks for bringing out some hapiness !
 
  • #7
Oh my...! . Well, that's a bummer... . :oldfrown:
Navin said:
I had a rather rough day today...
My day was about the same ol' same ol'... . :sleep:

ejection seat.jpg


I test those things for a living... you know... just stayin' alive, stayin' alive, ah, ah, ah, ah, stayin' alive. .
lmao.gif


.
 

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  • #8
OCR said:
My day was about the same ol' same ol'... . :sleep:

View attachment 231463

I test those things for a living... you know... just stayin' alive, stayin' alive, ah, ah, ah, ah, stayin' alive. . View attachment 231465

.

Oh my !
Thats...whoa !
Well all the best and good luck !
...but whoa ! I am stunned amazed frightened and shell shocked !
 

Related to What is the structural level of fibrous proteins: secondary or tertiary?

1. What are fibrous proteins?

Fibrous proteins are a class of proteins that have a long, thin shape and are characterized by their structural function. They are composed of long chains of amino acids and are responsible for providing structural support and strength to tissues such as tendons, ligaments, and muscles.

2. How are fibrous proteins different from globular proteins?

Fibrous proteins differ from globular proteins in terms of their shape and function. While globular proteins have a compact, spherical shape and are involved in metabolic processes within the body, fibrous proteins have a long, thin and extended shape and are primarily involved in providing structural support and strength to tissues.

3. What is the primary structure of fibrous proteins?

The primary structure of fibrous proteins refers to the linear sequence of amino acids that make up the protein. In fibrous proteins, the primary structure is characterized by the repetitive arrangement of a small number of amino acids, such as glycine, alanine, and proline, which allows for the formation of long, fibrous structures.

4. How are fibrous proteins organized?

Fibrous proteins are organized into long, fibrous structures through the process of polymerization. This involves the linking together of multiple protein subunits, or monomers, to form a long chain. The specific arrangement of amino acids within the protein determines the overall shape and structure of the fibrous protein.

5. What is the role of fibrous proteins in disease?

Fibrous proteins play important roles in various diseases. For example, mutations in the genes that code for fibrous proteins can result in structural defects that lead to diseases such as muscular dystrophy and osteogenesis imperfecta. Additionally, excessive production or accumulation of fibrous proteins has been linked to conditions such as fibrosis and amyloidosis.

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