What is wrong with this picture?

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  • #1
berkeman
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Summary:
A new industrial fence gate installed on the work site across from my workplace in Silicon Valley -- What fails do you see?
I've been keeping an eye on this for the last week or so, and today I walked across the street from my work building and had my best laugh in a week. What two main problems do you see in this new fence gate construction?

The property across from where I work in Silicon Valley is being torn down and rebuilt as a much larger technical office complex, so they've fenced off the block and will start tearing down the previous building soon. But whoever planned this perimeter fence seems to have neglected a couple of problems with this particular fence gate. Can you spot the two main problems that made me laugh? I can only imagine the conversations that went on with the workers that were installing the fence gate per the plans... :smile:

1633394240068.png
 
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Answers and Replies

  • #2
jrmichler
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Has anybody tried to open the gate yet? Can you set up a trail cam with video capability?
 
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  • #3
DaveC426913
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A pedestrian can just walk through it.
A vehicle will just push it open.

Having worked in security though, I can tell you, no security system is designed to stop intruders.

They are designed to
1] ideally discourage trespassers, but secondarily to
2] make attempted entry take sufficient time and noise until a human can arrive who can stop intruder.

In this case, I think 1] applies. The gate simply requests that you don't go this way. That will discourage everyone except those who are intent on breaking the law by knowingly trespassing. (And that is prosecutable.)
 
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  • #4
berkeman
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Has anybody tried to open the gate yet? Can you set up a trail cam with video capability?
I was tempted, but they have video surveillance of the worksite, and I didn't want to try to have a conversation with their site security with me laughing uncontrollably. I did mentally try to calculate the friction torque of the metal rollers on the metal rails at the angle of however many degrees, along with the rolling resistance of the hard rubber tires on pavement... Carry the seven... o0)
 
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  • #5
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I did mentally try to calculate the friction torque of the metal rollers on the metal rails at the angle of however many degrees, along with the rolling resistance of the hard rubber tires on pavement...

Lol. . . I thought it was a swinging gate . . :doh:

.
 
  • #6
DaveC426913
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Oh dear. I just assumed it was a slide type gate.
 
  • #7
Baluncore
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Is it built out of second hand components, slide gates, fitted to hinges on the wrong side of the gateposts? Did they start the process by placing the gate posts on the wrong sides of the entrance, or opening the wrong way?

They only need one camera, and do not have to repair cuts to the fence.
I don't believe it will be the main entrance during construction.
 
  • #9
256bits
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Another possibility.
It could be an ingenuous solution, and the guy got a bonus for being clever.
A gate that will never swing mindlessly, so that could explain the wheels.
And if you are insane you might try to open it by hand to drive through.

Notice that the two gates are not linked and chain locked.
 
  • #10
berkeman
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Notice that the two gates are not linked and chain locked.
Yeah that's their fully extended position. LOL o0)
 
  • #11
sophiecentaur
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I get the impression that PF has spent more time on this problem than the designers did.
Send them the bill.
 
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  • #12
DaveE
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Pondering those rollers on the rails makes my brain hurt. This is a perfect example of why I can't be a mechanical engineer. I think trigonometry may be involved...
 
  • #13
Vanadium 50
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It needs explosive bolts. Everything is better with explosive bolts.
 
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  • #14
Tom.G
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I was tempted, but they have video surveillance of the worksite, and I didn't want to try to have a conversation with their site security with me laughing uncontrollably.
Says the guy that rides his bike thru rattlesnake domiciles!

It is hard to tell from the photo, but I don't spot any hinges on the gates, and since the driveway is not crowned the gates would travel horizontally on the rails.

[edit] Oops. I thought the rails were horizontal, closer inspection shows they really are sloped! Oh well.
[/edit]
 
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  • #15
sophiecentaur
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1633787509194.png

works fine for me.
 
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  • #16
Vanadium 50
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I just use these:

1633787874608.png


And, in line with the subject of this thread, what's wrong with this sign? Two things, actually.
 
  • #17
Baluncore
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And, in line with the subject of this thread, what's wrong with this sign? Two things, actually.
If "land mines do not enter", then why the caution ?
If "land mines" have been cautioned not to enter, then it should be safe.
 
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  • #18
hmmm27
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Well... one could assume that your property is bereft of live land-mines. Also "Danger", not "Caution".
 
  • #19
Vanadium 50
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Also "Danger", not "Caution"
Right.

Then what color should it be?
 
  • #20
hmmm27
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Google Images shows a variety ; I assume you're voting for red. Sure, but yellow is more visible near/during nighttime.

Personally, I'd want a sign stating why exactly there's a minefield : current/former national defense property ; one of those WWI explosive-laden farms ; etc.
 
  • #21
Lnewqban
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I am unable to see any fail in that picture.
Nevertheless, the two yellow posts with the fixed barber wire should compensate for any shortcoming of the gate.
 
  • #22
hmmm27
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I am unable to see any fail in that picture.
Nevertheless, the two yellow posts with the fixed barber wire should compensate for any shortcoming of the gate.
Gate looks fine (albeit a bit gappy) to me : it's the barbed wire(?) that's worrisome.
 
  • #23
berkeman
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It is hard to tell from the photo, but I don't spot any hinges on the gates, and since the driveway is not crowned the gates would travel horizontally on the rails.
Yeah, I haven't tried pushing the gates, but from the direction of the wheels and the rollers on the rails in the fence sides, it looks to be meant to be pushed in-line with the fence. Of course, once you push one of them all the way in (and up at that angle) and go to push the other one up, the first one will roll back down behind you since there were no latches that I could see...
 
  • #24
Vanadium 50
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I assume you're voting for red.
Red-White-Black. Those are the colors for Danger signs. Caution is yellow/black. Warning is orange/black.
 

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