What should I do with my spacetime model?

In summary, the model of spacetime is based on an extension of the principle of relativity. It predicts that the momentum of a photon is correct, out of totally different eauations, and that the rest energy of a body is mc^2. However, the model makes time necessraily the same in all frames, which is weird.
  • #1
Ahmed1029
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I created a model of spacetime based on an extension I added to the principle of relativity. I then derived the coordinate transformations which preserve the speed of light in all frames, which are different from the Lorentz transformation. I worked out the formulae for energy and momentum, and what's strange is that they become classical mechanics at low speeds, predict that the rest energy of a body is mc^2 just like relativity, and the momentum of the photon turns out to be correct, out of totally different eauations. Should I publish it at this point, or will I be thought of as a crank? What should I do now?
 
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  • #2
For homogeneous and isotropic space and time, there are only three possibilities: Newtonian space and time , Minkowski spacetime, or a Euclidean spacetime. See the link below. I'm sceptical you have found anything additionally valid.

http://www2.physics.umd.edu/~yakovenk/teaching/Lorentz.pdf
 
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  • #3
I didn't include any assumptions about the nature of space in my formation, just that newly hypothesised premise and worked out the rest. What do you suggest I do to make sure that it's not just some fool's babble? I was ready to get rid of it in case it gave me wrong answers about fundemental values, but up till now the momentum of the photon and the rest energy are okay.
 
  • #4
The model however makes time necessraily the same in all frames, yet length behaves in some weird fashion that depends on direction. This is all weird but the formulae turn out to be true in the regimes I'm familiar with.
 
  • #5
Ahmed1029 said:
The model however makes time necessraily the same in all frames, yet length behaves in some weird fashion that depends on direction.
If your mathematics is valid, the you might have a mathematical curiosity.
 
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PeroK said:
If your mathematics is valid, the you might have a mathematical curiosity.
The math is actually too simple to be wrong
 
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Thread locked for Moderation...
 
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Ahmed1029 said:
I created a model of spacetime based on an extension I added to the principle of relativity. I then derived the coordinate transformations which preserve the speed of light in all frames, which are different from the Lorentz transformation. I worked out the formulae for energy and momentum, and what's strange is that they become classical mechanics at low speeds, predict that the rest energy of a body is mc^2 just like relativity, and the momentum of the photon turns out to be correct, out of totally different eauations. Should I publish it at this point, or will I be thought of as a crank? What should I do now?
This is not something we at PF can help with. PF is not for discussion of personal theories or personal research. If you want your model to be discussed here at PF, you need to get it published first. I do not think that will happen because, just from your description, it sounds like your model is not even wrong. But ultimately the decision of whether to try to get it published or not is up to you.

As for the question of whether you will be thought of as a crank, I think so after reading your description, because, as above, it sounds like your model is not even wrong. I suspect a lot of other people will agree.

Thread will remain closed.
 
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1. What is a spacetime model?

A spacetime model is a mathematical representation of the four-dimensional continuum of space and time. It is used in physics to describe the behavior of objects and events in the universe.

2. Why is a spacetime model important?

A spacetime model is important because it allows us to understand and predict the behavior of objects and events in the universe. It also helps us to understand the relationship between space and time, and how they interact with each other.

3. How do I create a spacetime model?

Creating a spacetime model involves using mathematical equations and principles from theories such as general relativity and quantum mechanics. It also requires a thorough understanding of the physical properties of the objects and events being modeled.

4. What can I do with a spacetime model?

A spacetime model can be used for a variety of purposes, such as predicting the motion of celestial bodies, studying the effects of gravity and other forces on objects, and understanding the behavior of particles at the quantum level. It can also be used to test and refine existing theories and to develop new ones.

5. How accurate are spacetime models?

The accuracy of a spacetime model depends on the complexity of the system being modeled and the accuracy of the input data. In general, spacetime models have been shown to accurately predict the behavior of objects and events in the universe, but they are constantly being refined and improved upon as our understanding of the universe evolves.

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