What To Do With A Box of 'Essential Oils'?

  • Thread starter Ignitia
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My friend gave me a box of essential oils. It seems pretty wasteful to throw them out (and it's a gift), but I have no idea what to do with them. Scented soaps or perfumes would be a fun project, but I don't have the other ingredients to do that. So, I'm taking suggestions.

(And what do I do with the book of 'Alternative Natural Healing' that came with it?)

List of Oils:
1. French Lavender
2. Lime (Citrus Aurantifolia)
3. Essential Oil Blend: one bottle composed of Coconut, Bergamont Orange, Coriander Seed, Marjoram, Peppermint, Geramium, Basil, Rose, and Jasmine
4. One unmarked bottle (has oil in it)
None of the bottles list concentrations.
 
Last edited:

Wrichik Basu

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(And what do I do with the book of 'Alternative Natural Healing' that came with it?)
I myself don't throw away books, even if they are not worth reading. But it's up to you whether you want to read it, store it in your bookshelf, or throw it away. A quick look through the pages should tell you whether you what you want to do with it.
 

Borek

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For me collection of three words: alternative, natural and healing in a title starts a Red Alert.

Don't even open the book, run for your life.
 

dlgoff

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For me collection of three words: alternative, natural and healing in a title starts a Red Alert.

Don't even open the book, run for your life.
Yep. But the OP should keep the oils just to smell once in a while. :olduhh:
 
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For me collection of three words: alternative, natural and healing in a title starts a Red Alert.

Don't even open the book, run for your life.
Haha. I'd donate it, but I fear the next owner will actually use it to heal their ailments. I don't want that on my conscience.

Still need ideas for the oils.
 
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I'd suggest getting a partner and finding out how useful those things could be for intimate massages. It could be a good way to break the ice with respect to removing clothing.
 
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Haha. I'd donate it, but I fear the next owner will actually use it to heal their ailments. I don't want that on my conscience.

Still need ideas for the oils.
Please list which oils they are.

Some (e.g geranium oil) can kill pyrethrin-resistant invertebrates while being almost completely harmless to vertebrates; others (e.g. tea tree oil) can kill bacteria while being only mildly toxic to humans. Oil of peppermint (high menthol content) can be a good pest repellent.

As for the book, I would regard it with a level of suspicion in the neighborhood of that expressed by @Borek; for my part, I would look at the table of contents, and the index, and maybe a few random paragraphs; if it was, in my view, after that cursory review, in the vicinity of as nonsensical as its title suggests, I would consign it to its possible future use as polluted but still recyclable paper.
 
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Please list which oils they are.

Some (e.g geranium oil) can kill pyrethrin-resistant invertebrates while being almost completely harmless to vertebrates; others (e.g. tea tree oil) can kill bacteria while being only mildly toxic to humans. Oil of peppermint (high menthol content) can be a good pest repellent.

As for the book, I would regard it with a level of suspicion in the neighborhood of that expressed by @Borek; for my part, I would look at the table of contents, and the index, and maybe a few random paragraphs; if it was, in my view, after that cursory review, in the vicinity of as nonsensical as its title suggests, I would consign it to its possible future use as polluted but still recyclable paper.
The book claims it can cure autism (No joke). I think that speaks volumes.

I've edited the oils in the first post.
 
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The book claims it can cure autism (No joke). I think that speaks volumes.
We've seen lots of outlandish and apparently ridiculous claims; not all of them have turned out to have been false (e.g. germ theory of disease); we should check how well or how poorly a claim is justified, on a case-by-case basis, before accepting or rejecting it.

Even so, a claim to have found a previously undiscovered 'cure' for autism, unless the claim is extremely well supported, is at best something that has at its origin an irresponsible and disrespectful claim, and more likely is something that originated from deliberate flimflam.

The claim implicitly suggests that the diligent work of thousands of competent scientists and other professionals who have worked themselves to exhaustion day in and day out for decades trying to to find anything that might help people suffering from that set of maladies, have failed in their efforts to leave no stone unturned that might possibly conceal a worthwhile insight, while the claimant has found the cure by sniffing around at essential oils that the scientists have pre-dismissed as being not worth investigating.

In fact, real researchers investigating autism and treatment options for it will readily acknowledge that some essential oils can have a beneficial effect; however, no responsible researcher at present claims to have discovered a cure for autism.
I've edited the oils in the first post.
Thanks for doing that. The unmarked bottle, if you and a dog can't by the odor tell enough about what it might contain, should be discarded. The other ones, if it were my choice, I would give to a nice girlfriend.
 
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Long, long ago, I used to extract such 'Essential Oils' from our Pharma 'Purchasing Samples' to establish their 'active' content before the approved bulk went into what we'd now call 'trad' cough mixtures, syrups etc...

Hey, their BP/BPC formulations really were better than placebos !!

Now, the smell of most such essences, along with the soaps, candles, pot-pouri petals etc they often 'enhance' generally set off my hay-fever at proverbial twenty paces, must be avoided...

So, give the gift-box of 'smellies' to an appropriately ditzy member of your extended family, or put it on the 'Charity' table.

As for the book, well, I've found each such may spawn several short fantasy stories, set in that alt-reality...
:wink:
 
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The book claims it can cure autism (No joke). I think that speaks volumes.
I would just recycle the book and check the smell of the oils. The ones with nice smell can be used to cover everyday smells in the kitchen, for example: the levander is traditionally used in long term storage of clothes.

For the less nice smells - well, I tend to use those as a counter-statement of ownership for 'cat-spray' in the garden.
 

Bandersnatch

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Don't even open the book, run for your life.
No no no. These books are very useful. Just check if the print quality is good - otherwise the pages might leave marks on the skin. You probably don't want your posterior to end up with a bunch of backwards Deepak Chopra quotes on it.

There are also alternative uses. The clue is in the OP's name and avatar.
Overall, great for camping.
 
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No no no. These books are very useful. Just check if the print quality is good - otherwise the pages might leave marks on the skin. You probably don't want your posterior to end up with a bunch of backwards Deepak Chopra quotes on it.

There are also alternative uses. The clue is in the OP's name and avatar.
Overall, great for camping.
Yeah, when you're out camping, readily burnable stuff can come in handy ...
 

pinball1970

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My friend gave me a box of essential oils. It seems pretty wasteful to throw them out (and it's a gift), but I have no idea what to do with them. Scented soaps or perfumes would be a fun project, but I don't have the other ingredients to do that. So, I'm taking suggestions.

(And what do I do with the book of 'Alternative Natural Healing' that came with it?)

List of Oils:
1. French Lavender
2. Lime (Citrus Aurantifolia)
3. Essential Oil Blend: one bottle composed of Coconut, Bergamont Orange, Coriander Seed, Marjoram, Peppermint, Geramium, Basil, Rose, and Jasmine
4. One unmarked bottle (has oil in it)
None of the bottles list concentrations.
Some funny replies from @sysprog @Borek k @Rive @Bandersnatch. I would tell your friend (after thanking them for the thought) that the science behind this sort of thing is either hippy nonsense or nonexistent just like homeopathy. A good mate will understand. They may choose to take it back and give it someone else.
 
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And what do I do with the book of 'Alternative Natural Healing' that came with it?
You could also use it for classic "Hippocratic" healing by disassembling the book. The papers can be used as bandages, the covers can be used as splints and the threads can be used to fasten the bandages and splints. Results may vary, though.
 

pinball1970

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Do you know there's a hilarious Deepak Chopra quote generator on the net? Here it is: http://wisdomofchopra.com/
It makes me smile every time I use it. :smile:
If I could give two likes to this I would.
I have just read some of these to a colleague out loud to see what he would make of them.
'What does that even mean?' Was the main comment. I laughed quite a lot.
 

pinball1970

Gold Member
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Oh, I've received The Wisdom many a time. It never disappoints.
'Transcendence is the path to intricate images.'

Awesome. I think a thread is required to explore the physics/other sciences and vocabulary of his statements.
 
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We wrote sentence segment concatenator programs like that for fun and exercise in the '70s -- I think the one that @DennisN pointed out, (repeating here the link that he posted:) http://wisdomofchopra.com/, is an especially good example of the genre.
 
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Some funny replies from ...@Rive
Man, I was completely serious :oldgrumpy:
We started with a deodorant, and one dose kept the neighboring cats away for ~ a week: it had just a mildly terrible stink by our standards. We switched to some 'aromatherapy oil' (we too got it as a gift) and now the garden is ours, finally ✌
 
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@Rive In my opinion, the best essential oil for keeping unwanted animals out of your yard is OC (oleoresin capsicum/capsaicin (pepper)) gel spray.
 
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@sysprog Well, we still want this garden being human-habitable, though... But we are using some chili 'tea' against aphids, if that counts :approve:
 
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@sysprog Well, we still want this garden being human-habitable, though... But we are using some chili 'tea' against aphids, if that counts :approve:
Chili powder is a good repellent, and lasts longer than pepper gel, but it's not as strong. Pepper gel won't bother humans if you wait a half hour or so and then don't get too close, but it will still repel other other animals for a week or so unless there's a pretty strong rain.
 

Klystron

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Chili powder is a good repellent, and lasts longer than pepper gel, but it's not as strong. Pepper gel won't bother humans if you wait a half hour or so and then don't get too close, but it will still repel other other animals for a week or so unless there's a pretty strong rain.
with the added benefit that birds like it or, at least, are not bothered.
 

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