What's the source of power of wizard in the Potter universe?

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For example in DBZ, the level of power is determined by the ki, so what about the potter universe?
 

Drakkith

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Tiny fusion reactors are built into every wand. How? Magic.
 
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CGI
 

Ryan_m_b

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The book has no justification. The ability to perform spells is determined by how well you can say/think them and wave your wand.
 
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This might help:
https://www.quora.com/What-makes-a-wizard-or-witch-powerful-in-the-Harry-Potter-world [Broken]
The reference is from the game "Book of Spells", which had J.K. Rowling's direct involvement in its development (and can hence be considered "official").
 
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phinds

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This might help:
https://www.quora.com/What-makes-a-wizard-or-witch-powerful-in-the-Harry-Potter-world [Broken]
The reference is from the game "Book of Spells", which had J.K. Rowling's direct involvement in its development (and can hence be considered "official").
That's good. Official magic makes so much more sense than just randomly making stuff up. :smile:
 
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That's good. Official magic makes so much more sense than just randomly making stuff up. :smile:
Officially made up stuff > Unofficial fan fiction
 

Drakkith

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For example in DBZ, the level of power is determined by the ki, so what about the potter universe?
The wizard energy comes from the quantum Klein-Gordon field ϕ(x). Its momentum density π(x) are given in Fourier space by

ϕ(x)=∫d3p(2π)31√2ωp(apeip⋅x+a†pe−ip⋅x) and

π(x)=∫d3p(2π)3(−i)√ωp2(apeip⋅x+a†pe−ip⋅x).
 
189
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The wizard energy comes from the quantum Klein-Gordon field ϕ(x). Its momentum density π(x) are given in Fourier space by

ϕ(x)=∫d3p(2π)31√2ωp(apeip⋅x+a†pe−ip⋅x) and

π(x)=∫d3p(2π)3(−i)√ωp2(apeip⋅x+a†pe−ip⋅x).
are you joking? I dont think so. You look to smart to be a joker.
 
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Fervent Freyja

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From what I can remember, the source of power originated from the blood(lines).
 

Fervent Freyja

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Sometimes yes, sometimes no. This was the source of controversy.
Can you elaborate further on why the source of power could be “sometimes no” in the bloodlines?

The Wizard gene is dominant, whereas Muggle genes are recessive. If a Muggle shows signs of magic, then either the gene was dormant and skipped generations, or somebody is lying (they were adopted or the mother cheated). You cannot transform a Muggle into a Wizard. I think that the controversy was centered more around purity and power, but the magic had to originate in the bloodlines to even begin that feud.
 
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Can you elaborate further on why the source of power could be “sometimes no” in the bloodlines?

The Wizard gene is dominant, whereas Muggle genes are recessive. If a Muggle shows signs of magic, then either the gene was dormant and skipped generations, or somebody is lying (they were adopted or the mother cheated). You cannot transform a Muggle into a Wizard. I think that the controversy was centered more around purity and power, but the magic had to originate in the bloodlines to even begin that feud.

Kindly refer to the evidence that supports your claim. Until then I remain firmly in the spontaneous generation camp.
 
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I haven't found a single answer. There may be more factors that influence the power.
The simplest could be the wand intself (materials used and it's history)

Another is wizard's experience and inner power

But l I think that the most important of all factors is love and sacrifice (I'm halfway through the last book).
 

jim mcnamara

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@phinds When in doubt sarcasm will usually get you points no matter what. I lived for years in a culture that actively feared witches and witchcraft. Stupid jokes were my only defense, since science was out of the question. Kewa Reservation, NM. (Santo Domingo Pueblo on old maps).
 

phinds

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@phinds When in doubt sarcasm will usually get you points no matter what. I lived for years in a culture that actively feared witches and witchcraft. Stupid jokes were my only defense, since science was out of the question. Kewa Reservation, NM. (Santo Domingo Pueblo on old maps).
Interesting. Were they hostile to science in general or just if anyone tried to apply it to their beliefs in unscientific things, or were they just indifferent to it in general, believing it to be irrelevant?
 

jim mcnamara

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@phinds
It was not relevant to them. At all. Their belief was: they already had all the answers.

One of my neighbors was convinced he was witched. I did not try to talk him out of it.

Another good friend was working in his field. A dust devil formed and swept over him. He fell extremely ill later that day. Dust devils are spirits of evil beings.

You have to just go with the flow, and stay out of it. Yet other experiences with non-science explanations: My wife died in my house. Months later, a breeze blew through the house. Although I thought all the doors and windows were shut, my neighbors from the Rez told me it was the spirit of my wife leaving and saying good-bye. I thought it was one of those gusts that sometimes come down thru fireplaces. But what did I know?

It simply boils down to the kind of thinking virtually everyone in the Western world had prior to the Renaissance. It persists. In the Western world, too.
 

phinds

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@phinds
It was not relevant to them. At all. Their belief was: they already had all the answers.
Worrisome to find that in the modern world in an advanced country. Some Indian tribes have somewhat adapted to the modern world. Hard to run casinos if you don't believe the technology works. Is this one a particularly backward tribe?
 

jim mcnamara

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@phinds Not really, just very conservative, and somewhat xenophobic (justifably). No casino though. Everyone has a cellphone, for what that's worth. I think you are a bit too sanguine about the level of Science understanding in the US:

http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2014/09/why-do-people-believe-in-ghosts/379072/
They cite a poll in 2014 - 42% of people in the US believe in ghosts.

You & I are out numbered, my friend, if you add in young earth creationists to this mix:
33%.
http://ncse.com/blog/2013/11/just-how-many-young-earth-creationists-are-there-us-0015164
 
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phinds

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@phinds Not really, just very conservative, and somewhat xenophobic (justifably). No casino though. Everyone has a cellphone, for what that's worth. I think you are a bit too sanguine about the level of Science understanding in the US:

http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2014/09/why-do-people-believe-in-ghosts/379072/
They cite a poll in 2014 - 42% of people in the US believe in ghosts.

You & I are out numbered, my friend, if you add in young earth creationists to this mix:
33%.
http://ncse.com/blog/2013/11/just-how-many-young-earth-creationists-are-there-us-0015164
Oh, I've posted here several times about how about 40% or more of people in the US believe in angels, ghosts, space aliens and probably unicorns for all I know. I always think those number as too high, but not outrageously too high for reality.

I have relatives who are otherwise seemingly sane, productive members of society and good family folks, but who believe in insane stuff like creationism and the young Earth. One of them has a PhD in math is technically brilliant but thinks Evolution is nonsense.
 

Fervent Freyja

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Kindly refer to the evidence that supports your claim. Until then I remain firmly in the spontaneous generation camp.
How could a person do that to another person? I'm not going to dance around 10,000 pages just to find evidence. Where is yours by the way?

I have been left no choice to do this.

"Proof that the Potterverse and all constituents within, whether magical or non-magical matter are predetermined.
Thence, regardless of any prior inference about the nature of magic in the Potterverse, namely, nutty notions of spontaneous generation of magic and who-knows-what-else, cannot exist under the laws of this proof; which is again, that all constituents of the Potterverse had causal dependence on J.K. Rowling finger-strokes up until finalization of the literature that defines the Potterverse."

:angel:
 

Fervent Freyja

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I haven't found a single answer. There may be more factors that influence the power.
The simplest could be the wand intself (materials used and it's history)

Another is wizard's experience and inner power

But l I think that the most important of all factors is love and sacrifice (I'm halfway through the last book).
Certainly, there is an emotional component that is rewarding in the series. I enjoyed the friendships the most growing up. I do not really believe a person is ever truly sacrificing though, that comes about when there is no other choice or a need is present, and it isn't glamorous or noble to do so- quite ugly actually. If you notice, Harry Potters behavior is mostly driven by pure need, he rarely initiates anything else, and is neither a hero nor a total coward. I love the human, realist aspect of the character.
 

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