Where does the tensile strength locate?

In summary, yield strength is the stress at which noticeable plastic deformation occurs. However, it may be difficult to find this point on a graph. As a result, it is common to define yield strength as the stress at which 0.2% inelastic strain occurs, which is represented on the graph. This value is used in industry because elastic deformation near the yield stress is not linear and 0.0% is not a suitable value.
  • #1
aiklone1314
25
0
Hi,
i read my online note, it state that yield strength is stress at which noticeable plastic deformation has occurred but why when i see the graph, it doesn't means like what it written.
below is the graph make me confusing.
 

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  • #2
aiklone1314 said:
Hi,
i read my online note, it state that yield strength is stress at which noticeable plastic deformation has occurred but why when i see the graph, it doesn't means like what it written.
below is the graph make me confusing.

Except mild steel the yield point is difficult to find. So people usually define that the stress at 0.2% inelastic strain is yield strength.
You can find the 0.2% inelastic strain position is drawed specially in the graph, that's the reason. And, 0.2% inelastic strain is noticeable in industry use.
It is 0.2% inelastic strain but not 0.0% because elastic deformation do not fully agrees to Hooke's law. The elastic deformation near yield stress is not linear. So 0.0% is not a proper value.
 
  • #3


I can explain that the tensile strength is the maximum stress a material can withstand before breaking or rupturing. It is typically located on a stress-strain curve, which plots the relationship between the applied stress and the resulting strain of a material. The point at which the curve starts to deviate from a linear relationship is known as the yield point, and this is where plastic deformation begins to occur. However, it is important to note that the yield strength and tensile strength are not always the same. The tensile strength is the ultimate strength of a material, meaning the maximum stress it can withstand before breaking, while the yield strength is the stress at which plastic deformation begins. This is why the graph may not match exactly with the written definition. It is also worth noting that the tensile strength can vary depending on factors such as the composition and processing of the material.
 

Related to Where does the tensile strength locate?

1. Where is the tensile strength of a material located?

The tensile strength of a material is located in its internal bonds and molecular structure. It is a measure of the maximum stress a material can withstand before breaking or deforming.

2. How is tensile strength determined?

Tensile strength is determined through a standardized testing process called a tensile test. This involves subjecting a sample of the material to increasing levels of tension until it breaks, and measuring the amount of force required to cause the break.

3. What factors affect tensile strength?

There are a variety of factors that can affect the tensile strength of a material, including its chemical composition, structure, and processing techniques. Other factors that may influence tensile strength include temperature, strain rate, and external forces such as impact or vibration.

4. Can tensile strength be improved?

Yes, the tensile strength of a material can be improved through various methods such as alloying, heat treatment, and cold working. These processes can alter the internal structure and bonds of the material, making them stronger and more resistant to tension.

5. Why is tensile strength an important property of materials?

Tensile strength is an important property of materials because it helps determine their suitability for different applications. Materials with high tensile strength are desirable for structural components, as they can withstand large amounts of tension without breaking. On the other hand, materials with lower tensile strength may be better suited for applications where flexibility and ductility are important.

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