Which Substance is Covalently Bonded: SiO2 or C6H12O6?

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In summary, the conversation discusses various substances that are covalently bonded, including SiO2 and C6H12O6. The question is raised about whether hydrogen bonds count as covalent bonds. The conversation also mentions that carbon allotropes are held together by intermolecular covalent bonds, and that graphite is a counterexample. In conclusion, it is suggested that SiO2 is the correct substance in question.
  • #1
apchemstudent
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I tried to google this but i found 2 substances that are covalently bonded. SiO2 and C6H12O6. Which one is the correct one? does hydrogen bonds count as covalent bonds? if not then it might be SiO2... Anyone have any ideas? Thanks
 

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  • #2
I'm guessing A)

carbon allotropes are held together by intermolecular covalent bonds, intramolecular bonds don't apply.

you'll find that the intermolecular bonds may be dipole-dipole, vander wall etc...despite intramolecular covalent bonding in the other choices
 
  • #3
I'll go for C.For A i'd the graphite as the typical counterexample.Check the crystalization geometry of [itex] \mbox{SiO}_{2} [/itex],i think it fits.

Daniel.
 

Related to Which Substance is Covalently Bonded: SiO2 or C6H12O6?

1. What is a covalent bond?

A covalent bond is a type of chemical bond where two atoms share one or more pairs of electrons in order to achieve a stable electron configuration.

2. How can you determine if a substance has covalent bonds?

A substance is likely to have covalent bonds if it is composed of non-metal elements, and if it has a low melting and boiling point, as these properties are indicative of weak bonds between molecules.

3. Is SiO2 covalently bonded?

Yes, SiO2 (silicon dioxide) is covalently bonded. Silicon and oxygen are both non-metal elements, and SiO2 has a melting point of 1713°C and a boiling point of 2230°C, which are relatively low temperatures compared to ionic compounds.

4. How about C6H12O6, is it covalently bonded?

Yes, C6H12O6 (glucose) is also covalently bonded. Carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen are all non-metal elements, and glucose has a melting point of 146°C and a boiling point of 295°C, again indicating weak bonds between molecules.

5. Can a substance have both covalent and ionic bonds?

Yes, it is possible for a substance to have both covalent and ionic bonds. For example, a molecule of sodium chloride (NaCl) has both covalent bonds within the chlorine molecule and ionic bonds between sodium and chlorine atoms.

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