White space drive & casimir cavities?

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In summary, there is discussion about the possibility of NASA building a warp drive, but it seems to be based on limited physics such as "negative vacuum energy" and "Casimir cavities." There is also discussion about the Casimir effect and its ability to produce negative energy, but it is uncertain how this would translate into a working warp drive. Overall, the idea of a NASA warp drive still seems like speculation and there are questions about the validity of the physics involved.
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Had this directed to my attention:
How NASA might build its very first warp drive
I'm guessing the popular science press is overhyping again.

I see a brief mention in the article about "negative vacuum energy" and the possibility of "Casimir cavities" being "a way forward" ... which seems to be the extent of the physics mentioned.

Isn't "negative vacuum energy" a form of unobtainium?

I did see this discussion of energy densities re Casimir effect.
I just know people are going to ask me about this - so discussion welcome. What is White on about? What is he actually doing at NASA?
 
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The casimir effect allows to get energy densities below the energy density of the vacuum. If the energy density of the vacuum is 0*, this corresponds to a negative energy.

*it has to be some very small value, otherwise the expansion of the universe would look different.
 
  • #4
"one may be tempted to denote these geometries as 'exotic' solutions of the Einstein field equation, as they violate the energy conditions and generate closed timelike curves"
-- Francisco S. N. Lobo: arXiv:0710.4474v1 [gr-qc]

One may indeed :)
(actually quite a neat overview - thanks)

I'd imagine that having one leg of a Michealson Morely Interferometer through a Casimir cavity (the only experimental evidence mentioned) would produce a fringe shift. We would normally treat the vacuum energy as zero when we use the Einstein equations wouldn't we? Of course it isn't - so how firm is the idea that the Casimir effect produces the kind of "negative energy" that we would otherwise associate with exotic matter distributions?

Meantime - reading references...
It still feels like spin-doctoring to me.
 

Related to White space drive & casimir cavities?

What is a white space drive?

A white space drive is a theoretical propulsion system that uses the energy from the vacuum of space, also known as the "white space", to generate thrust and propel a spacecraft.

How does a white space drive work?

The exact mechanism of how a white space drive would work is still unknown, as it is a highly debated topic among scientists. However, the general concept is that it would utilize the Casimir effect, which is a quantum phenomenon that creates a force between two closely spaced metal plates in a vacuum. By manipulating this effect, it is theorized that a spacecraft could generate thrust and move through space.

What are Casimir cavities?

Casimir cavities are small spaces between two metal plates in a vacuum, where the Casimir effect can be observed. These cavities are important in the study of white space drives, as they are the key component in generating thrust using this theoretical propulsion system.

What challenges are associated with developing a white space drive?

There are several challenges associated with developing a white space drive. One is the lack of understanding of the Casimir effect and how to manipulate it for propulsion. Another challenge is the engineering of a spacecraft that can withstand the extreme forces and temperatures involved in this type of propulsion. Additionally, the energy required to power a white space drive is currently beyond our technological capabilities.

What are the potential applications of a white space drive?

If a white space drive were to be successfully developed, it could revolutionize space travel by allowing for much faster and more efficient propulsion systems. It could also potentially be used for asteroid deflection and other forms of space exploration. However, these applications are still purely theoretical at this point.

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