Why are emission spectra of stars rarely shown?

In summary: It is possible to get an imperfect image of the corona with a terrestrial coronagraph telescope. This puts a disc over the intermediate image inside the scope which covers the Sun's main part. But it only takes you so far. You can't get away from the effects of the atmosphere. Hubble does some solar measurements by this method ( a different camera from the deep space one!) An alternative would be to use a large disc at some distance in front of a space telescope to produce your own 'eclipse' but it
  • #1
pkc111
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e.g I dont think I ve ever seen one of our Sun.
According to this link you just have to anlayse the light that isn't coming from a place on the star that has a light the source directly behind it e.g wouldn't looking at light from the outer edge of star give you an emission spectrum?

http://www.thestargarden.co.uk/Spectral-lines.html
 
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  • #3
Yes thank you so much phys guy..that makes perfect sense. I am still not quite sure why they have to wait for an eclipse, I would have thought they could just sample light coming from the outer edge of the Sun, but anyways I am sure they have their reasons ;)
 
  • #4
pkc111 said:
Yes thank you so much phys guy..that makes perfect sense. I am still not quite sure why they have to wait for an eclipse, I would have thought they could just sample light coming from the outer edge of the Sun, but anyways I am sure they have their reasons ;)
If you do not wait for an eclipse you will be completely blinded by the thermal emission spectrum from the Sun.
 
  • #5
yes I read that, so I am wondering why you wouldn't use a camera (viewed on a monitor) to just select from the outer light ring?
 
  • #6
pkc111 said:
yes I read that, so I am wondering why you wouldn't use a camera (viewed on a monitor) to just select from the outer light ring?
Should be a doddle? No. The brightness of the Sun's disc is so great that there is far too much 'spillage' of light on its path through the atmosphere to get the detail that a total eclipse can give us.
It is possible to get an imperfect image of the corona with a terrestrial coronagraph telescope. This puts a disc over the intermediate image inside the scope which covers the Sun's main part. But it only takes you so far. You can't get away from the effects of the atmosphere. Hubble does some solar measurements by this method ( a different camera from the deep space one!) An alternative would be to use a large disc at some distance in front of a space telescope to produce your own 'eclipse' but it all needs to be out in space and carefully guided.
 
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1. Why are emission spectra of stars rarely shown?

The emission spectra of stars are rarely shown because they are difficult to observe and interpret. Additionally, the equipment and techniques required to capture and analyze emission spectra are often expensive and complex.

2. What is an emission spectrum?

An emission spectrum is a unique pattern of spectral lines that are produced when an element or molecule emits light. Each element or molecule has its own specific emission spectrum, making it useful for identifying the composition of a substance.

3. How are emission spectra of stars obtained?

Emission spectra of stars are obtained through spectroscopy, which involves breaking down the light emitted by a star into its individual wavelengths. This can be done using instruments such as a spectrometer or a spectrograph.

4. What can we learn from the emission spectra of stars?

The emission spectra of stars can provide valuable information about the composition, temperature, and motion of a star. By analyzing the spectral lines, scientists can determine the elements present in a star, as well as its temperature and whether it is moving towards or away from us.

5. Are there any limitations to using emission spectra to study stars?

Yes, there are limitations to using emission spectra to study stars. One limitation is that it can be difficult to accurately interpret the data, as there are many factors that can affect the emission spectrum of a star. Additionally, some stars may not emit enough light or have a complex spectrum that is challenging to analyze.

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