Why don't birds get shocked on power lines?

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  • #36
davenn
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Electricity works in mysterious ways.

that's a poor misquote

in fact electricity is pretty well understood
 
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  • #37
davenn
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. This will bring -the suit's- voltage (and that of the guy inside!) up to that of the power line

(NO)

if it were the case, there would be no point wearing the suit
 
  • #38
b.shahvir
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that's a poor misquote

in fact electricity is pretty well understood

There's a huge difference between 'pretty well' and 'perfectly'.
 
  • #39
davenn
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There's a huge difference between 'pretty well' and 'perfectly'.

it's well enough understood to totally negate your comment and has been for a long time
 
  • #40
Sooty
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(NO)

if it were the case, there would be no point wearing the suit

(YES)

The point of the suit is not to somehow 'stop the occupant's voltage from becoming that of the line'... it's to prevent voltage -gradients- from being created across any part of his body. What 'does the damage' is not the voltage per se... it's the current that flows solely 'cos a gradient permits it to do so. No gradient, no current... or is that (NO) also?:cool:

PS
If (NO), you forgot to explain what IS the point of wearing the suit...
 
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  • #41
davenn
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PS
If (NO), you forgot to explain what IS the point of wearing the suit...


Unbelievable seriously !!
It is as you stated but maybe you don't believe ... an example of a Faraday shield
The electric field DOES NOT penetrate the suit .... skin effect ensure that

There's a number of www sites that will give you that answer :smile:

you continue to contradict yourself .....

The point of the suit is not to somehow 'stop the occupant's voltage from becoming that of the line'... it's to prevent voltage -gradients- from being created across any part of his body.
 
  • #42
Sooty
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Unbelievable seriously !!
It is as you stated but maybe you don't believe ... an example of a Faraday shield
The electric field DOES NOT penetrate the suit .... skin effect ensure that

There's a number of www sites that will give you that answer :smile:

you continue to contradict yourself .....
I never said it 'penetrated' anything. Believably! Seriously! Read it again - I said it prevents voltage -gradients- from being created across any part of his body.

PS - Any more examples of me 'continuing to contradict' myself?... maybe starting with one example of where I did actually contradict myself... :biggrin:
 
  • #43
davenn
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I never said it 'penetrated' anything. Believably! Seriously! Read it again - I said it prevents voltage -gradients- from being created across any part of his body.

So, as he approaches the line, he reaches out with a conducting rod that is connected to his suit. This will bring -the suit's- voltage (and that of the guy inside!)

Yes you did say it ...... there is the contradiction !

to bring the guy's body inside up to the line voltage ... it MUST penetrate the suit DOH

and as I have told you, that doesn't happen ... the guy inside is shielded
 
  • #44
Sooty
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Hmmm...
The electric field DOES NOT penetrate the suit
followed by
to bring the guy's body inside up to the line voltage ... it MUST penetrate the suit DOH
Right, got it! 😄
 
  • #45
Dale
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There's a huge difference between 'pretty well' and 'perfectly'.
It is, in fact, perfectly understood. There is no known EM phenomena which cannot be explained with our current EM theory. It can correctly give the outcome of every EM experiment performed to date.
 
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  • #46
anorlunda
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The OP question has been answered over and over and over again.

Thread closed.
 
  • #47
Dale
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@davenn in this case @Sooty is correct.

A Faraday suit forms an equipotential surface. An E field is the gradient of the voltage. So the Faraday suit forces the E field inside to zero, but does not force the voltage to zero. It is equipotential, not zero potential.
 
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