Why hydrogen is not used to compare the relative atomic mass

In summary, hydrogen is not used to compare the relative atomic mass because it has a unique atomic structure and can vary in mass. Instead, the most commonly used element for this purpose is carbon-12. While there are instances where hydrogen can be used, it is not the preferred reference element. The use of a reference element allows for standardized and accurate measurements of the relative atomic mass of elements, which is determined through mass spectrometry.
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Johannah Wu
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Is that because of some historical reasons or E=mc2(i mean something about binding energy)?
 
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See the section "History of the atomic mass unit" on this page:

http://www.sizes.com/units/atomic_mass_unit.htm

(I first went to the Wikipedia page about the atomic mass unit, which doesn't say much about the early history; then followed the "external link" at the end of the article.)
 
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1. Why is hydrogen not used to compare the relative atomic mass?

Hydrogen is not used to compare the relative atomic mass because it has a unique atomic structure compared to other elements. Its atomic mass is not representative of the majority of elements and can vary depending on the isotope. Therefore, using hydrogen as a reference point could lead to inaccurate measurements of the relative atomic mass of other elements.

2. Is there a specific element that is used to compare the relative atomic mass?

No, there is no specific element that is universally used to compare the relative atomic mass. However, the most commonly used element for this purpose is carbon-12, which has a defined atomic mass of 12 atomic mass units (amu). This allows for more accurate and consistent comparisons between elements.

3. Can hydrogen ever be used to compare the relative atomic mass?

While it is not commonly used, there are instances where hydrogen can be used to compare the relative atomic mass. This is typically only done when comparing elements that are similar in atomic structure, such as hydrogen and helium. In these cases, the relative atomic mass of hydrogen is used as a reference point since it is the lightest element.

4. What is the significance of using a reference element to compare relative atomic mass?

Using a reference element, such as carbon-12, allows for a standardized and consistent method of measuring the relative atomic mass of elements. This is important in scientific research and calculations, as it ensures accuracy and allows for easier comparisons between different elements.

5. How is the relative atomic mass of an element determined without using hydrogen as a reference?

The relative atomic mass of an element is determined by comparing it to the atomic mass of the reference element, usually carbon-12. This is done using mass spectrometry, which measures the mass-to-charge ratio of atoms. The relative atomic mass of an element is then calculated by multiplying its mass-to-charge ratio by the atomic mass of the reference element.

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