Why is Fundamental Math Failing Me?

In summary, the conversation revolves around a misunderstanding of the equations for converting silver and copper pieces, with the individual eventually realizing their mistake and finding clarity.
  • #1
My Fundamental Math Failing

This should illicit a chuckle or perhaps despair in humanity.

The statement "One silver piece is equivalent to two copper pieces" is not equivalent to the equation "S = 2C" (Where S = silver and C = copper). I cannot for the life of me figure out why. I can work out every other way that to find the number of silver pieces you take the number of copper pieces and divide by two, and therefore it becomes "S = C/2", but I cannot look at the original statement and explain precisely why that makes sense.

I'm a physics major.
 
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  • #2
What?
 
  • #3
JProffitt71 said:
...

to find the number of silver coins you take the number of copper coins and divide by two

Also nonsense. you do not.

OK, I'm a doofus. Of course the number of silver coins is the the number of copper coins and divide by two. I was so distracted by your mistake in the first part that I let my mouth get ahead of my brain (not the first time).
 
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  • #4
phinds said:
Look. Assign a copper coin the value of 50 cents and the silver coin the value of a dollar and examine your nonsensical statements

That makes perfect sense, and I am still perplexed. I suppose the graph is what I have an issue with. In my mind I expect it to show equivalent exchange at all points, and it does not. It actually shows the inverse.

disregardthat said:
What?

This is what happens when I do not get enough sleep it seems.
 
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  • #5
The problem is that you're using the same symbol to mean two different things. In the equation S=2C, S and C stand for the value of the silver and copper pieces. But in the equation S=C/2, S and C stand for the number of silver and copper pieces that you have (assuming that currency can be exchanged at will). Since the two equations are modeling different things, it is no surprise that the equations are different.
 
  • #6
Citan Uzuki, thank you very much. Order has been restored. I am quite a fool.
 
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1. What is "Fundamental Math Failing"?

"Fundamental Math Failing" refers to the inability to understand and apply basic mathematical concepts and principles.

2. What are some common causes of "Fundamental Math Failing"?

Some common causes include lack of early exposure to math, poor teaching methods, learning disabilities, and lack of practice and reinforcement.

3. How does "Fundamental Math Failing" affect individuals?

Individuals with "Fundamental Math Failing" may struggle with everyday tasks that require basic math skills, such as managing finances or measuring ingredients for cooking. It can also limit career opportunities in fields that require strong math skills.

4. Can "Fundamental Math Failing" be overcome?

Yes, with proper instruction and practice, individuals can improve their math skills and overcome "Fundamental Math Failing". It is important to identify the specific areas of weakness and work on them consistently.

5. How can I help someone who is struggling with "Fundamental Math Failing"?

You can help by providing support and encouragement, finding resources and tools to aid in learning, and seeking out a tutor or teacher who specializes in teaching math to individuals with learning difficulties. Patience and understanding are also key in helping someone overcome "Fundamental Math Failing".

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